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The Legacy of Chitrasutra – Eleven – Jaina Kanchi

24 Sep

[This is the Tenth article in the series.

This article and its companion posts may be treated as an extension of the series I posted on the Art of Painting in Ancient India .

The present article looks at the not-so-well-known Jain temple of Trailokya-natha-swami (Vardhamana) at Jaina Kanchi. It is one of the few surviving ancient Jain temples in Tamil Nadu.

This article presents the case of an overzealous and yet a wrong way of conserving the ancient murals. The Department of Archaeology of the State Government, in their wisdom, laid a fresh coat of paint over the sixteenth century murals drawn in Vijayanagar style, in order to keep the paintings fresh and bright. The art experts and art historians were shocked and angry; and described the action of the Government Department as thoughtless; and a disaster.

There surely must be a sensible way that falls somewhere between total neglect and overzealous reaction, which either way harms the ancient art-objects.

In the next article we shall look at the traditional mural paintings of Kerala. These 16th-17th century murals painted over the walls in temples and palaces have a unique style of depiction and colour schemes. ]

Continued from the Legacy of Chitrasutra – Ten – Lepakshi

 

40. Jainism in Tamil Nadu 


40.1. It is believed that Jainism entered Southern India in around fourth century BC, when Acharya Bhadrabahu (433 BC- 357 BC), along with about 1,200 of his disciples, migrated to the Sravanabelagola region, in Karnataka, as he feared a severe drought was about to hit the North India. And, soon thereafter, the monk Visakhacharya, at the behest of Acharya Bhadrabahu, moved over to the Chola and Pandya countries along with a group of sramanas (Jain monks), in order to propagate the faith of the Thirthankaras.

40.2. Some scholars argue that a sizable number of sravakas (Jain householders) were already present in the Madurai, Tirunelveli and Pudukottai regions; and they lent support and care to the emigrant monks. In any case, there is evidence to indicate that Jainism came into existence in Tamil Nadu, at least, by about fourth century BC. Thereafter it took roots in Tamil Nadu and flourished till about sixteenth century when it went into decline, due a combination of reasons. It is estimated there are now about 50,000 Tamil – Jains or Samanar who have a legacy that is more than 2,000 years old; and that most of them are engaged in farming in the North Arcot (Thondai-mandalam) region.

40.3. As regards Kanchipuram, the capital city of the Pallavas and a renowned centre of learning, the Jainism flourished there because of the recognition, acceptance and encouragement it gained from the ruling class, as also from common people. It is said; the Pallava King Mahendra-varman I (600 – 630 CE), in the early part of his life, caused the construction of two temples dedicated to Thirthankaras Vrishabdeva and Vardhamana.

40.4. The Jain scholar-monks such as Acharyas Sumantha-bhadra, Akalanka, Vamana-charya Pushpa-danta, Kunda- kunda and others, were highly regarded for their piety and scholarship. Under their guidance a number of Jain temples and educational institutions (samana-palli) were established in the Tamil country, especially in its Northern regions.

[Palli is a Prakrit term, which by extension came to mean, in the Tamil – Brahmi inscriptions, a Jaina monastery or a temple or a rock shelter where the Jaina monks stayed and studied  . Some say that the Tamil term for a school –“palli”- has its origin in the ancient samana-palli of the Jains].

40.5.The recognition accorded to Jainism is evidenced by the fact that a sector of Kanchipuram, along the banks of the Palar River, was named as Jaina Kanchi. It is now a hamlet (Tiruparuttikunram) on the southwest outskirt of the present-day – Kanchi, a little away from the Pillaiyaar Palayam suburb. Jaina Kanchi does not ordinarily attract many tourists.

40.6. Jaina Kanchi is now of interest mainly because of its two temples:  one dedicated to Chandra-prabha the eighth Thirthankara; and the other dedicated to Vardhamana the twenty-fourth Thirthankara who is also addressed as Trailokya-natha-swami. And, the other reason of interest is the ancient paintings in the Vardhamana temple.

The Chandra-prabha temple is the earlier and the smaller of the two. It was constructed during the reign of Parameswaravarman II, the Pallava king who came to throne in 728 AD.

According to Dr. T. N. Ramachandran, the Trailokya-natha-swami temple was built perhaps during the end of the Pallava period; that is, in the eighth-ninth century.

41. Trailokya-natha-swami (Vardhamana)

41.1. Trailokya-natha-swami temple enjoyed the patronage of Pallava kings as also of Chola emperors Rajendra I (c. 1014-44), Kulottunga I (c. 1070 – 1120), and Rajendra III (c. 216-46) during whose periods some improvements were made and a front pavilion (mukha mantapa) was added to the sanctum. The Vijayanagar kings too supported this Jain temple.

During the year 1387, Irugappa, a disciple of Jaina- muni Pushpasena; and a   minister of Vijayanagar King Harihara Raya II (1377-1404), expanded the temple by adding a larger pavilion- the Sangeetha mantapa.

Later additions were made by Bukka Raya II (in 1387-88) and Krishna Deva Raya (in 1518). It is also said; Krishna Deva Raya made a “land-grant” to the temple.

41.2. Trailokya-natha thus developed into a complex of three shrines: One for Vardhamana and Pushpadanta; the other for Padmaprabha and Vasupujya; and the third for Parshvanatha and Dharma Devi. Each shrine has its own sanctum, ardha-mantapa and mukha-mantapa. The temple is also a repository of a large number of icons.

During the 14th and 16th centuries, the ceiling of the sangeetha – mantapa were decorated with beautiful paintings, in Vijayanagar style.

It appears Jainism was active in the Kanchipuram region at least till around the 16th century.

42. The Paintings

42.1. The paintings drawn on the ceiling of the Sangeetha-mantapa during the period 14th and 16th centuries were in Vijayanagar style of painting; and they depicted the legends of the Thirthankaras, particularly those of Rishabha Deva and Vardhamana.

42.2. A narrative panel relates the story of Dharmendra, the serpent king, who offered his kingdom to the relatives of Rishabha Deva in exchange for their consent not to disturb the meditation of Rishabha Deva.

42.3. Such narratives were alternated with scenes depicting processions of elephants, horses, soldiers, standard bearers and musicians.

42.4. The sequence of the narratives and the court scenes was broken by depiction of Sama-vasarana the adorable heavenly pavilion where the eligible souls gather to receive divine discourse.

The term Sama-vasarana (Sama avasarana) means an assembly which provides equal opportunities for all who gather there. Samavasarana, in Jain literature denotes an assembly of Thirthankara.  At this assembly different beings – humans, animals and gods – are also present to behold the Thirthankara and hear his discourses. The common assembly, at which different beings are gathered for one purpose, treats all alike overriding the differences that might exist among them. A  Sama-vasarana is thus, a tirth, a revered place.

The Sama- vasarana is pictured in a very interesting fashion. Each panel is depicted with eight concentric rings having miniature figures, trees and shrines painted along their periphery. A Thirthankara is enshrined at the core of the Samava-sarana theme.

42.5. There are a few panels that resemble   the Krishna- Leela, the legends of Krishna. But, they in fact, depict life events of Neminatha, the twenty-second Jain Tirthankara. According to Jaina lore, Neminatha was the cousin of Krishna of Srimad Bhagavatha; and he is Krishna’s counterpart in the Jain tradition.

 

43. The other side of bad maintenance

43.1. The pictures posted above are not as they were painted by the artists of the 14th and 16th centuries.

A few years back, the State Archaeological Department of Tamil Nadu repainted the 14th-16th century murals on the ceilings of the Trailokya-natha-swami temple. A fresh coat of  paint was laid over the old murals. The repainting was done allegedly by untrained artists, who were not familiar with the techniques of conservation or restoration of ancient murals. As a result, the murals now dazzle in bright colors.

The pictures you just saw were those of the “re-painted” art works.

43.2. The art experts and art historians were aghast, pained and angry at the thoughtless action, in violation of conservation norms, by the very Department that was entrusted with the task of protecting and maintaining the ancient murals.

Dr. David Schulman, an Indologist, (currently the Professor, Department of Indian, Iranian, and Armenian Studies, Hebrew University, Jerusalem) who has studied mural paintings of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh, said “The paintings of the Trilokyanatha temple at Tiruparuttikunram have been ruined by over- painting. This is quite a common thing in Tamil Nadu. If you repaint it instead of conserving it, the subtlety will be lost; the old colors will be lost. This is disaster. These paintings have to be preserved as they were at their height. The way people do it in Europe.”

The other experts too remarked that repainted murals resemble neither the Vijayanagar style nor the present style.

K.T. Gandhirajan, who has studied murals in 35 temples in Tamil Nadu over a period of six years, said “Only experts can do that. The State government should give up repainting the faded murals because there are not enough trained artists to do the work. Instead, it can use the resources to conserve them.”

43.3. At an international seminar titled “Painting Narratives: Mural Painting Traditions in the 13th-19th centuries”, held near Chennai during Jan, 2008, the participating experts expressed their shock and disappointment at the state of conservation of ancient art in India.

According to the experts, the ancient paintings in India are threatened with destruction through negligence and desecration both by the public and, unfortunately, by the very persons entrusted with the task of preserving them. To cite an example , in a major “renovation “ exercise at the Meenakshi temple of Madurai an important series of Nayak murals from the 16th century were covered with cement paint. The ancient paintings are lost forever.

The mural paintings  of Tamil Nadu have a long, rich and continuous tradition, ranging from the Pallava period to the Nayaka period. It was during the Vijayanagar and Nayaka periods that the art of painting in temples in Tamil Nadu flourished. Most of the murals in the State belong to the Vijayanagar and Nayaka periods. A few belong to the Maratha period of the 18th century.

Even in the temples where a few murals have survived, they have been whitewashed. In some cases, ignorance led to the neglect of the works of art. In many other cases, soot from oil lamps settled over the murals; electrical cables and switchboards were installed over them; or nothing was done to prevent cracked ceilings and sunlight endangering the murals.

44. And, now…

44.1.   I have tried to present in this post the other side of the bad conservation. There are countless cases where the ancient art works are ruined because of neglect or wilful harm. There are also cases, as in Jaina Kanchi, where either by ignorance or by over enthusiasm, the authenticity of the ancient works is degraded. Between these extremes, somewhere, there surely must be a sensible way of taking care of our heritage. As Dr. Schulman remarked, “These paintings have to be preserved as they were at their height. The way people do it in Europe”.

44.2. These mural paintings are not mere bunch of drawings; they are the repositories of our art, culture, history and heritage; they are a part of our very being. It is essential that the general public in India and also the trustees of our art works are educated of the value of our heritage and their historical importance.

44.3. Doubtless, there are problems in taking care of our ancient wall paintings, for want of proper conservation facilities; dearth of trained and qualified conservators; paucity of resources etc.  But what is more worrying is the absence of a  plan or  policy  in place; and lack of a  perspective  vision to conserve even those wall paintings that are under the  care and custody of the governments.

44.4. It is a task, which the government alone cannot handle well; several institutions, Universities as also traditional artists need to take part in this endeavour. I wish we had a sort of National Project for Conservation of Wall Paintings, which would comprehensively address the issues of research, training, creating special curriculums in art-schools, and mobilization of various sorts of resources; and above all an effective management and monitoring system.

Next

The traditional mural paintings of Kerala

References and sources

Tiruparuttikunram and its Temples.–By T. N. Ramachandran, M.A

Bulletin of the Madras Government Museum,

Printed by the Superintendent, Government Press, Madras.

http://www.ias.ac.in/jarch/currsci/3/00000187.pdf

http://spicyflavours.net/index.php?autocom=blog&blogid=5&showentry=95

http://www.india9.com/i9show/Tirupparuttikunram-25644.htm

http://www.tnarch.gov.in/cons/temple/temple5.htm

http://www.geocities.com/tamiljain/spread.html

Seminar proceedings

http://www.muralpaintingtraditionsinindia.com/Seminar%20proceedings.htm

Jainism in south India by  T. K. Tukol

www.ibiblio.org/jainism/database/ARTICLE/south.doc

Recent discoveries of Jaina cave inscriptions in Tamilnadu by Iravatham Mahadevan

http://jainsamaj.org/literature/recent-171104.htm

Ravaged murals

http://www.hinduonnet.com/fline/fl2516/stories/20080815251606400.htm

Conservation problems of mural paintings in living temples by S. Subbaraman

http://www.muralpaintingtraditionsinindia.com/S%20Subbaraman.htm

Overview of the conservation status of   mural paintings in India

http://www.muralpaintingtraditionsinindia.com/op%20agarwal.htm

All pictures are from Internet

 
11 Comments

Posted by on September 24, 2012 in Art, Indian Painting, Legacy of Chitrasutra

 

Tags: , , ,

11 responses to “The Legacy of Chitrasutra – Eleven – Jaina Kanchi

  1. Ruchika

    August 4, 2014 at 6:07 am

    Dear sir,

    I am an artist and I am current planning to work on a new project about Jainism in tamil nadu.I found your information and article about the same really amazing and resourceful . Since I live in Mumbai and I am unable to visit the temple, I would like to know if you have any idea if the temple still exists and If the paintings on the wall are still the same.

    Please get back to me on the same, Awaiting your reply.

    Thank and Regards,
    Ruchika Jain

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      August 4, 2014 at 12:05 pm

      Dear Ruchika

      Thanks for breathing life into an old and a forgotten blog.
      1. Yes; these Jain temples of 5-6th century decorated with murals later in the centuries do exist. They are located at a village near Kanchipuram. The name of the village is Tirupparuthikkundram (Pronounced: Tiru-paruthi-kundram) situated on the banks of a minor river the Palar. These temples are presently under the charge of the Tamil Nadu Archaeology Department.
      Sadly; the temples are not a part of the popular tourist circuit. They are visited mostly by scholars who intend to study the murals. As I understand; the exteriors of the temples are in a rather bad shape. However, thanks to the efforts of some dedicated iJain families in the neighbourhood of the temples , the interior of the temple is fairly well maintained; and, the deities inside the temple are well preserved and worshipped.
      Please check the following YouTube presentation of the murals on the walls and on the ceilings.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9Mom2ILDKc

      Please also check the following links for some more details of the temples and the associated poetry
      http://www.herenow4u.net/index.php?id=76592

      http://www.hindupedia.com/en/Kanchipuram

      2. Please also check my blog on the murals at Sittanvasal

      https://sreenivasaraos.com/tag/lotus-in-jain-paintings/

      3. As regards Jainism in Tamil Nadu; please check

      http://www.tamiljains.org/
      and
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamil_Jain

      and follow them up

      Please keep talking.

      Regards

      [Incidentally, Jainism is a vibrant and living religion in parts of Karnataka – say , in the districts of Hassan, Chickmagalur and in border areas of Belgaum district. Jainism is particularly strong in in the South Kanara district. The third century huge monolithic statue of Gommata at Sravanabelagola is world renown. There similar statues of standing Bahubali at Venur and Karkala in South Kanara. All the related Jain temples are in active worship. The followers of this religion are entirely local people who have been its adherents over the centuries. Jainism is very much a local religion rotted in its soil; and , is not an implant.]

       
      • Ruchika jain

        August 6, 2014 at 7:55 am

        Dear sir,
        I am so glad that you have replied. Thank you so much for The informations and details that you have provided , they are going to be very helpful for me. I am currently studying mural in jj school of arts Mumbai (post graduate).I am in my final year so I have decided to work on Jain Temple Tirupparuthikundram Kancheepuram for my final project. I would love to have your support for the same. I need to write a thesis on this so I would like to know a few more additional details :
        1. I have read in many articles and blogs that the paintings in the temple were recently re painted , is it that they were re painted to the original work before or any modifications have been made on them. Is the originality still there ?
        2. Further I shall be going to kanceepuram in the month September. You had mentioned earlier that the temples can be visited only by scholars who intend to study murals and not by tourists so if I go down to kanchi will I need any pre permission from TNAD. If yes, do you have any idea how do i approach them. Basically can I visit the temple for studying it..?
        I am a growing artist and this project is one of my first big works, so it would be a great pleasure if you can please stay in touch and provide me your expertise knowledge in this field.

        Thanks and regards,

        Ruchika Jain

         
  2. Ruchika

    August 19, 2014 at 9:38 am

    Dear sir,
    I am so glad that you have replied. Thank you so much for The informations and details that you have provided , they are going to be very helpful for me. I am currently studying mural in jj school of arts Mumbai (post graduate).I am in my final year so I have decided to work on Jain Temple Tirupparuthikundram Kancheepuram for my final project. I would love to have your support for the same. I need to write a thesis on this so I would like to know a few more additional details :
    1. I have read in many articles and blogs that the paintings in the temple were recently re painted , is it that they were re painted to the original work before or any modifications have been made on them. Is the originality still there ?
    2. Further I shall be going to kanceepuram in the month September. You had mentioned earlier that the temples can be visited only by scholars who intend to study murals and not by tourists so if I go down to kanchi will I need any pre permission from TNAD. If yes, do you have any idea how do i approach them. Basically can I visit the temple for studying it..?
    I am a growing artist and this project is one of my first big works, so it would be a great pleasure if you can please stay in touch and provide me your expertise knowledge in this field.

    Awaiting your reply.

    Thanks and regards,

    Ruchika Jain

     
  3. sreenivasaraos

    August 20, 2014 at 10:41 am

    Dear Ruchika

    1.Please see para in the blog on restoration efforts
    2.Please also check all the links provided at the bottom of the blog and my responsive to you.
    3.Temple is open to public. But , not many tourists visit it

    4.There are caretaker families residing near the temple (I read of Smt Padmavathi , am not sure)
    Please make inquiries
    5. If there are specific questions over which I can help , I surely will do
    6.Please keep in touch

    God Bless you
    Warm Regards

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      August 20, 2014 at 10:45 am

      Please also see Jainism in South India by Justice TK Tukol
      check Google

       
  4. sreenivasaraos

    March 19, 2015 at 8:00 pm

    Thanks for the information… but i could not follow the comment

    “k.t. gandhirajan, who has studied murals in 35 temples in tamil nadu over a period of six years, said “only experts can do that. the state government should give up repainting the faded murals because there are not enough trained artists to do the work. instead, it can use the resources to conserve them.”

    43.3. at an international seminar titled “painting narratives: mural painting traditions in the 13th-19th centuries”, held near chennai during jan, 2008, the participating experts expressed their shock and disappointment at the state of conservation of ancient art in india.”

    we are inefficient descendants of expert artists – does this reflect subversions from encroaching races by which people were forced to show no interest…
    uno should spend money to preserve indian ancient heritage rather than squandering money on rich countries who already have power to preserve/conserve with their own money.
    partiality will stub knowledge…
    ether

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      March 19, 2015 at 8:00 pm

      dear ether, thank you. the experts were angry because the repainting was done by untrained artists, who were not familiar with the techniques of conservation or restoration of ancient murals. the desired the government to arrange for training the artists in restoration and conservation works.

      as regards uno, it participates in conservation of only those recognized as unesco heritage sites or monuments. the unesco has its own set of norms. further, as dr. o.p. agrawal, director-general, intach (indian national trust for art and cultural heritage) said, “our country is full of wall paintings. in every state, there are hundreds of [wall] paintings, which are not so well known,” but, neither the intach nor the governments has an inventory of those murals. they have to necessarily do their home work, make attempts to preserve whatever that has survived, before approaching uno or unesco or any other external organization. in the current state of affairs, the ancient murals take the least priority. therefore, as shri dsampath remarked, the next generation might get to see these old things only through photographs, i fear.

      wish you and your family a very happy and prosperous new year.

      with best wishes and warm regards

       
  5. sreenivasaraos

    March 19, 2015 at 8:02 pm

    here is a saying in tamil
    does a donkey know the wonderful smell of camphor..?
    i am sure eventually murals of the old will live on photographs tha have been taken..
    wish you a happy and prosperous new year..

    DSampath

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      March 19, 2015 at 8:02 pm

      dear shri sampath, thank you. your prediction might true eventually; i fear.

      wish you and your family a very happy and prosperous new year.

      with best wishes and warm regards

       

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