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Saptamatrka – Part Four

Continued from Part Three

Radiant Goddesses

41.1. The group of seven mother-like goddesses, Matrikas, as commonly accepted, consist Brahmi, Vaishnavi, Maheshwari, Kaumari, Varahi, Indrani and Chamunda.

ब्राह्मी माहेश्वरी चैव कौमारी वैष्णवी तथा । वाराही च तथेन्द्राणी चामुण्डा सप्तमातरः ॥

According to a version of their origin, as narrated in Devi Mahatmya, it is said, the Matrka goddesses were created by male Gods in order to aid Mahadevi in her battle against the demons Shumba and Nishumba.

The Matrkas emerge as Shakthis from out of the bodies of the gods: Brahmi form Brahma; Vaishnavi from Vishnu; Maheshwari from Shiva; Kaumari from Skanda; Varahi from Varaha; and Indrani from Indra. They are armed with the same weapons, wear the same ornaments and ride the same vahanas and also carry the same banners like their corresponding male Gods do. Saptamatrkas as a group indicate transformation of the male identities of gods into goddesses. These seven mother goddesses, celebrated as a group, are an embodiment of the female principle of prakrti, the counterpart of purusha.

Group composition

 

 

41.2. The Saptamatrka group is, thus, composed of: two Vaishnava Shakthis (Vaishnavi and Varahi); two Shaiva Shakthis (Maheshwari and Kaumari); one Brahmi Shakthi, in addition to Indrani (Aindri) and Chamunda. It is a group of six Deva Shakthis and one Devi Shakthi, making it into an integrated unit of seven.

42.1. Many have attempted to explain the rationale in the composition of Saptamatrka group. One explanation mentions that the group of seven goddesses was derived from the gods that were considered important during the Gupta period. By then, the major gods – Shiva and Vishnu – had already attained independent – super status within the Vedic pantheon. Brahma was in any case one among the trinity, though a less impressive one. And, Skanda had risen into prominence since the time of Kushanas when he was absorbed into Shiva pantheon; and he developed further during the Gupta era. Varahi the counterpart of Varaha was more popular during the Gupta period than any other avatar of Vishnu. Aindri is the only counterpart of the Vedic gods who by then had lost their importance. Chamunda, of course, represents the principal feminine force. The omission of the counter part of Surya who was a major god, acceptable to all sects, during the Gupta period is rather surprising. Similarly, of Ganapathi who was just beginning to rise to prominence.

42.2. The Saptamatrkas were earlier connected with Skanda (Kumara), but in later times were absorbed into the sect of Shiva himself. Aptly, the Saptamatrka panel begins with Ganesha, the son of Shiva; and ends with an aspect of Shiva such as Bhirava or Virabhadra. Sometimes, Natesha or Vinadhara – Dakshinamurthy represents Shiva. The presence of Ganesha at the beginning of the panel, it is explained, is prompted by the faith that Ganesha as the Lord of the Ganas would remove obstacles; help the devotee in his pursuit; and guide him along   his endeavour. From the sixth century onwards inclusion of Ganesha in the format became a standard practice. Thereafter, depiction of Ganesha and Shiva, and sometimes along with Skanda, became quite common. For instance, In the Matrka panels at Aihole and Elephanta caves Ganesha and Skanda are shown as child gods along with Shiva. Thus, in association with Chamunda, the Saptamatrka panel was rendered into a composite unity.

43.1. As regards the presence of Ganesha and Virabhadra at either ends of the Saptamatrka   panel, Shri DSampath observes, elsewhere: The Saptamatrikas symbolically represent the seven different aggressive tendencies of the female part of a human being. When unleashed; they tend to destroy the wellness that comes out of a fostering mother. Children below the adolescent age are likely to be influenced by such harmful energies. Those adverse influences breed in kids a sort of ’non- motherly’ destructive attitude. And, these aggressive tendencies (energies) are meant to be contained and held in check by the two male energies: of Vinayaka who was ‘mother- born’ and who regarded all women as mothers; and of Virbhadra who could invoke motherly virtues in any woman. Between the manifestation of rational Vinayaka and the fiery Virabhadra these female energies were to be harnessed.

43.2. The other significant aspect about the Saptamatrka group formation is the order in which they appear in the traditional texts. The order symbolizes the cycle of creation and its cessation; and presents it as the functions of female power-Shakthi.

The order of the Saptamatrka usually begins with Brahmi symbolizing creation. It is often represented by the all-comprehensive primordial Nada Om (pranava).Then, Vaishnavi provides the created world with symmetry, beauty and order. Maheshwari, who resides in the hearts of all beings, breaths in life and individuality. Kaumari, Guru-guha, the intimate guide in the cave of one’s heart, inspires aspirations to develop and evolve.  Varahi is the power and aggressive intent to go after enjoyment. Indrani is the sovereignty intolerant of opposition and disorder .Chamunda is the destroyer of delusions and evil tendencies, paving way for spiritual awakening.

43.3. The most important significance of Saptamatrka symbolism is the implication of the cyclical universal time and its cessation. In the standard versions, Brahmi symbolizes creation; Vaishnavi the preserver occupies the central position flanked by three goddesses on each side. The cycle of periodic time ends with dissolution symbolized by Chamunda. She is the only Devi Shakthi among the Matrkas. She is at times depicted as one who exists beyond death and time. Kalabhairava, who usually appears at the end of the Saptamatrka panel, symbolizes liberation from cycle of birth and death. Thus, it is said, Saptamatrkas epitomize the process of creation, preservation and death; and, the final liberation that takes one beyond time. This is in tune with the Shaktha theology which rationalizes creation, preservation and destruction of the world as the functions of female power-the Shakthi.

In Sri Chakra

44.1. In the Sri Chakra, Chatushra the outermost four-sided square field (bhupura – the earth stretch) known as Trailokya-mohana-chakra is composed of three lines which make way for four doors (dwara) on four directions.  These sets of lines are also described as the layers of the enclosure wall which surround the city of the Devi (Tripura). The three lines are understood to represent three planes of existence: attainments, obstructions and powers. The three planes are related to the body-mind complex and its experiences with the world around. The associated goddesses are worshiped by the aspirant seeking protection and guidance as he/she enters into Sri Chakra.

44.2. Along the outer line the ten Siddhis (attainment-divinities) reside; along the middle line reside eight Matraka  the Mother-like powers; and, and along the inner line are the ten Mudra-devatas (goddess who empower).

44.3. As said; the middle wall (line) is guarded by the Matrkas. The wall is red in colour; the red of the rising sun, signifying the  Rajo guna of the Matrkas who are said to represent eight types of passions. The Matrkas, according to Bhavanopanishad of Bhaskararaya Makhin, are said to be dark blue in color; wearing red garments; carrying a red lotus and a bowl filled with nectar.

44. 4. The Bhavanopanishad (9) recognizes Matrkas as eight types of un-favourable dispositions, such as: desire, anger, greed, delusion, pride, jealousy, demerit and merit.  Tantra-raja-tantra (36; 15-16) expands on that and  identifies Brahmi with desire (Kama);Maheshwari with the tendency to degenerate and dissipate (krodha);Kaumari with youthful longings to enjoy (lobha);Vaishnavi with power to fascinate and delude (moha); Varahi with pride and arrogance (mada);Indrani with jealousy and envy (matsarya);Chamunda with urge to sin (papa) and hurt(abhichara); and , Mahalakshmi with doing good (punya) with other than altruistic reasons. Matrkas who rule over such un-favourable dispositions are worshipped by the Sadhaka with prayers to suppress and overcome the evil tendencies that obstruct his progress.

44.5. According to Khadgamala (vamachara) tradition of Sri Vidya, the eight Matrkas are located along the wall (four at the doors and four at the corners) guarding the city (Tripura) on all eight directions: Brahmi on the West; Maheshwari on the North; Kaumari on the East; Vaishnavi on the South; Varahi on North-west; Aindri on the North-east; Chamunda on the South-east; and, Mahalakshmi on the South-west. Please see the figure below.

44.6. As you may notice, the Matrkas of Rajo–guna who govern over human passions are on the outer layer of the Sri Yantra. This signifies that the Sadhaka should get past passions and prejudices before he enters into the city of the Devi.

Matrka

Brahmi

Hamsarudha prakarrtavaya sukastraka-mandala
Sutram cha pusthakam ghate urdhva-hastha advaye shubhe (Rupamandana)

 

45.1. Brahmi or Brahmani the first Matrka is the shakthi of Brahma. She is depicted in bright golden complexion, having four faces and four hands. In her back- right hand, she carries a kamandalu and in the back- left hand an Akshamala. The front- right hand gestures Abhaya and the front- left hand bestows Varada. She is seated under a Palasha tree,   upon a red lotus. She is adorned in a mellow bright garment (Pitambara) and various ornaments; and, has on her head karanda-makuta. Her vahana and her emblem is the swan (Hamsa): (Amsumadbhedagama and Purva-karanagama).

45.2. The Vishnudharmottara describes Brahmi as having six hands. Of the three hands on the left, the lowest one gestures Abhaya; while the other two hold Pustaka (book) and kamandalu. On her right, the lowest hand gestures Varada; while the other two hold Sutra and Sruva (a ladle for pouring oblations of ghee into fire). It also mentions deer-skin as a part of her attire.

Aum Dhevee Brahmani Vidmahe

Maha-shakthiyai Cha Dhimahee
Thanno Dhevee Prachodayath

 

Vaishnavi

Vaishnavi Vishnu saddasi Garudapasi samsthitha

Chaturbhuja varada shankha chakra gadadhara (Rupamandana)

 

46.1. Vaishnavi is the Shakthi of Vishnu. She is seated upon a lotus, under a Raja – vriksha, the great tree. She is dark in complexion. She has a lovely face, pretty eyes and wears a bright yellow garment. Her head is adorned with kirita-makuta. She is richly decorated with ornaments generally worn by Vishnu. She wears the Vanamala, the characteristic garland of Vishnu. The emblem on her banner as well as her vahana is the Garuda. When depicted with four arms, she carries in one of her hands the chakra and in the corresponding left hand the shankha; her two other hands are held in the Abhaya and the Varada mudra. (Devi-Purana and Purvakaranagama)

46.2. The Vishnudharmottara states that like Brahmani, Vaishnavi also has six hands; the right hands are characterized by the Gada, Padma and Abhaya and the left ones by Shankha, Chakra and Varada.

Aum Thaarksh Yathwajaaya Vidmahe

Chakra Hasthaya Dhimahee

Thanno Vaishnavi Prachodayath

 

Maheshwari

Maheshwari prakarrtavaya Vrishabasana samasthitha

Kapala shula khatvanga varada cha chaturbhuja  (Rupamandana)

47.1. Maheshwari also known as   Raudri, Rudrani and Maheshi is the Shakthi of Shiva. She is white in complexion; and has   three eyes. She is depicted with four arms; two of which are in the Varada and the Abhaya mudra, while the other two hands hold the Trishula and Akshamala .Sometimes, she is also shown holding Panapatra (drinking vessel) or axe or an antelope or a kapala (skull-bowl) or a serpent. Her banner as well as the vahana is Nandi (bull). She wears snake-bracelets; and   Jata -makuta on her head.

47.2. The Vishnudharmottara mentions that Goddess Maheshwari should be depicted with five faces, each possessing three eyes and each adorned with jata-makuta crown and crescent moon. Her complexion is white. She is depicted with six arms. In four of the hands she carries the Sutra, Damaru, Shula and Ghanta. The other two hands gesture Abhaya and Varada mudra. Her banner also has the Bull for its emblem.

Aum Vrushath-vajaaya Vidmahe

Miruga Hasthaya Dhimahee

Thanno Maheshwari Prachodayath

 

Aindri

Indrani Indra-sadrishi vajra-shlu-gada dhara

Gajasngata Devi lochanirvasu bhivrta (Rupamandana)

 

48.1. Aindri, also known as Indrani, Mahendri, Shakri and Vajri, is the shakthi of Indra; her complexion is dark- red. She is seated under the Kalpaka tree. She is depicted as having two or three or a thousand eyes, like Indra. The Indrani is depicted with four arms. In two of her hands she carries the Vajra (thunderbolt) and the shakthi; while the other   two gesture Varada and Abhaya mudra. Sometimes, she is shown holding Ankusha (goad) and lotus. She is richly ornamented; and adorned with Kirita Makuta. Her vahana as well as the emblem on her banner is the charging elephant. (Devi-purana and Purvakaranagama)

48.2. According to the Vishnudharmottara, Indrani should be depicted with thousand eyes; and she should be of golden colour. She should have six arms, four of the hands carrying the sutra, Vajra, Kalasa (a pot) and Patra (a drinking cup) and the remaining hands being held in Abhaya and Varada mudra.

Aum Gajath-vajaayai Vidmahe

Vajra Hasthaya Dhimahee

Thanno Indrani Prachodayath

 

Varahi

Varahim tu pravakshyami mahiso rismsthtam
Varaha-sadrisham ghantanada chamara-dharini
Ghanta chakra gada-dhara padma danvendra vighatini
Lokanamcha hitarthaya sarvavyadhi vinasini (Rupamandana)

 

49.1. Varahi is the Shakthi of Varaha, an incarnation of Vishnu. The Markendeya Purana praises Varahi as a granter of boons and the regent of the northern direction.  Varahi is shown with the face of a boar and having dark complexion resembling the storm cloud. She is sometimes called Dhruma Varahi (dark Varahi) and Dhumavati (goddess of darkness). Varahi is seated under Kalpaka tree. And, her Vahana as well as the emblem on her banner is an elephant. She wears on her head a Karanda Makuta and is adorned with ornaments made of corals. She wears on her legs Nupura-anklets. She wields the hala and the shakthi and is seated under a Kalpaka tree. The PurvaKaranayama says that she carries Sarnga-Dhanush (bow), the hala (plough) and musula (pestle) as her weapons.

49.2. In other descriptions, Varahi is identified as the Yami, the shakthi of Yama. Varahi is described holding a Danda (rod of punishment) or plough, goad, a Vajra or a sword, and a Panapatra. Sometimes, she is said to carry a bell, chakra, chamara (bunch of yak’s hair  used as flywhisk) and a bow; and riding a buffalo.

49.3. In the Raktabija episode of Devi Purana, Varahi is described as having a boar form, fighting demons with her tusks while seated on a preta (ghoul).

49.4. To this description the Vishnudharmottara adds that Varahi has a big belly and six hands, in four of which she carries the Danda (staff of punishment), khetaka (shield), khadga (sword), and pasha (noose); while the two other hands gesture Abhaya and Varada mudra-s.

49.5. When depicted as part of the Sapta-Matrika group, Varahi who is called Panchami (the Fivefold One) is always in the fifth position in the row of Matrikas. It is explained; Varahi summarizes fivefold elements: water, fire, earth, air and ether. Each of these elements is related to lion, tiger, elephant, horse and Garuda (bird-human) which serve as vehicles of Vishnu. Varahi as the shakthi of Vishnu is depicted with head of a boar having three eyes and eight arms holding in her six hands a discus, conch-shell, mace, lotus, noose and plough; while the other two hands gesture Abhaya and Varada mudra-s. She is depicted as riding, alternatively, a Garuda, a tiger, a lion, an elephant or a horse.

49.6. In the Sri Vidya tradition, Varahi occupies a special position as Para-Vidya (superior power) .She is described as Dandanayika or Dandanatha – the commander-general of goddess Tripurasundari’s army. She is also the chief- counsellor (maha-mantrini) to the Devi. Varahi is also said to stand in a ‘father’ position to the Devi, while Kurukulla is the ‘mother’.

49.7. Varahi has presence in the Buddhist Tantric lore, also. There, she is described as the fierce Vajra-varahi or Vajra-yogini.

Aum Varaaha-muhi Vidmahe

Aanthra-shani Dhimahee

Thanno Yamuna Prachodayath

 

Kaumari

Kumaara rupa Kaumari mayura bar vahana
Raktha vastra dhara padma-shula-shakthi-gandhara eti Kaumari (Rupamandana)

 

50.1. Kaumari also known as Kumari, Karttikeyani and Ambika is the power of Kumara or Skanda; the war – god .Her depictions resemble that of Kumara. She is ever youthful, representing aspirations in life. Kaumari is also regarded as Guru-Guha the intimate guide who resides in the cave of one’s heart. She is shown seated under a fig tree (Oudumbara) riding a peacock, which is also her emblem.  Her complexion is golden yellow; and is dressed in red garments. She wears garland of red flowers. Kaumari has four hands; and carries Shakthi and Kukkuta (cockerel) or Ankusha (goad). The other two hands gesture Abhaya and Varada mudras. She is adorned with a makuta said to be bound with Vasika or Vachika. She embodies ideas of valour and courage. (Purvakaranagama and Devi Purana).

50.2. According to the Vishnudharmottara, Kaumari should be shown with six faces and twelve arms; two of her hands gesturing Abhaya and Varada mudras.  In her other hands she carries the Shakthi, Dhvaja, Danda, Dhanus, Bana, Ghanta, Padma, Patra and Parasu. Each of her heads has three eyes; and is adorned with karanda-makuta.

Aum Sikid-vajaaya Vidmahe

Vajra Hasthaya Dhimahee

Thanno Kowmari Prachodayath

 

Chamunda

Dastrala kshindeha chagatrakarshana bhimrudani

Dig-bahuksham kushisa musalan chakra marganaum//
Ankusha bibharti khadgam daksnesvatah
Khetaasa dhanurdandam kutharam chalti bibarti//
Chamunda pretaga raktha bikratasyahi bhusanath
Dvibhuja prakatray kartika karyamnuintra //

 

51.1. Chamunda also known as Chamundi; and, Charchika is the Shakthi of Devi (Chandi). She is the destructive form of Devi; and is similar in appearance and habits to Kali.  Devi Mahatmya recounts that in the course of her fight with demons Chanda and Munda, Devi created from her forehead the terrible form of Chamunda.

There are , however,  alternate explanations.

According to the text of the Devi Mahatmya, Kali is celebrated as Chamunda after she overpowers and beheads Chanda and Munda.

śiraścaṇḍasya kālī ca ghītvā muṇḍameva ca  prāha pracaṇḍā aṭṭahāsa miśra mabhyetya caṇḍikām  7.23॥

The Devi, then, declares that since Kali presented her with the heads of these two demons, she would henceforth be renowned in the world as Chamunda – cāmuṇḍeti tato loke khyātā Devī bhaviyasi .Thereafter in the text, Kali and Chamunda become synonyms.

Yasmāc-Caṇḍa ca Muṇḍa ca ghītvā tvamupāgatā  Cāmuṇḍeti tato loke khyātā Devī bhaviyasi  7.27

Bhaskararaya Makhin, however, interprets the term Chamunda, differently, as: ‘chamum, ‘army’ and lati, ‘eats’; meaning that Chamunda is literally ‘she who eats armies’—a reference to Kali as Chamunda who drinks the blood of the army of the demon Raktabija.

jaghāna raktabīja ta cāmuṇḍā apītaśoitam  sa papāta mahīpṛṣṭhe śastra saghasam āhata  8.61

He regards the Mahadevi Chamunda, in her integrated form (Samasti), as of the nature of the Brahman- Brahma-svarupini. She combines in herself her other diversified (Vyasti) forms of Mahalakshmi (Aim); Mahasarasvathi (Hrim); and, Mahakali (Kilm). 

51.2. Coming back to Chamunda as as a Matrika, unlike other Matrikas, Chamunda is an independent goddess. She is also praised as the fertility goddess of Vindhya Mountains She is also associated with Yama.

The descriptions of Chamunda are varied.

One of the descriptions of Chamunda mention of her as a goddess of terrible countenance, black and scowling, with drawn sword and lasso, holding a Khatvanga, wearing a garland of severed heads  (munda-mala) suspended by their hair. Chamunda is clad in a tiger skin, hungry and emaciated, mouth hideously distorted and the tongue protruding out. She sits upon a seat made of three skulls; and has a cadaver for footrest. She plucked off the heads of Chanda and Munda and presented both heads to Kausiki.

51.3. In other descriptions, a bear’s skin is tied over Chamunda’s clinging skirt, with its head and legs dangling on her back. She wears the skin of an elephant as a cape and grasps two of the animal’s feet in her uppermost hands. In her other hands she brandishes an array of weapons and awe-inspiring objects.

51.4. Chamunda is often depicted as dark in colour with very emaciated body, having three eyes, sunken belly and a terrifying face with a wide grin. Her hair is abundant and thick and bristles upwards. Her abode is under fig (oudumbara) tree. On her sunken chest, swings garland of skulls (mundamala) in the manner of a Yajnopavita. She wears a very heavy jata-makuta formed of piled, matted hair tied with snakes or skull ornaments. Sometimes, a crescent moon is seen on her head. Her garment is the tiger skin. Chamunda is depicted adorned by ornaments of bones, skulls, serpents and scorpions, symbols of disease and death. And in her four hands she holds damaru (drum), trishula (trident), khadga (sword) and panapatra (drink-vessel). She is riding a Jackal; or is seated in Padmasana or is standing on a corpse of a male (shava or preta).She is accompanied by fiends and goblins. She is surrounded by skeletons or ghosts and beasts like jackals, who eat the flesh of the corpse that the goddess sits or stands on. The jackals and her fearsome companions are sometimes depicted as drinking blood from the skull-cup or blood dripping from the severed head.

51.5. Purva-karanagama mentions that Chamunda, red in colour, should be depicted with wide open mouth set in a terrifying face having three eyes. Her socket eyes are described as burning like flames. She has a sunken belly; and, wears on her head the digit of the moon as Siva does. She has four arms. The black or red coloured Chamunda is described as having four, eight, ten or twelve arms, holding a Damaru (drum), trishula (trident), sword, a snake, skull-mace (khatvanga), thunderbolt, a severed head and panapatra (drinking vessel, wine cup) or skull-bowl (kapala), filled with blood, an urn of fire. She wears in her ears Kundla-s made of Conch shell (Sankha Patra). Her Vahana is an Owl; and the emblem of her banner an Eagle.

51.6. Vishnudharmottara describes Chamunda as having a terrific face with powerful tusks and seated upon a male corpse. She has a very emaciated body and sunken eyes and ten hands. The belly of this goddess is thin and apparently empty. She carries in her ten hands: Musala, Kavacha, Bana, Ankusha, Khadga, Khetaka, Dhanus, Danda and Parasu.

Aum Pisaasath-vajaaya Vidmahe

Soola Hasthaya Dhimahee

Thanno Kali Prachodayath

 

Narasimhi

52.1. In the Devi Mahatmya, the Saptamatrkas (the seven Matrkas) mentioned are: Brahmi, Maheshwari, Kaumari, Vaishnavi, Varahi, Indrani and Chamunda. At times, Narasimhi is mentioned in place of Chamunda. In some versions, the Martkas are counted as eight (Ashta-Matara) by including Narasimhi. There is also a tradition of Ashtamatrikas, eight Matrkas, which is prevalent in Nepal region. In Nepal, the eighth Matrka is Maha-Lakshmi (she is different from Vaishnavi). Narasimhi does not figure in the lists of Devi Purana and in Nepal.

52.2. Narasimhi or Narasimhini or Narasimhika with the face of a lion, fierce claws and four arms is the shakthi of Narasimha. She is said to have came out from the heart of the Devi. As Matrka, Narasimhi is regarded as an independent deity; and not as a female counterpart of Narasimha. In The Vaishnava School, she is believed to be an aspect of Lakshmi who pacified the ferocious Narasimha.

52.3. In Devi Mahatmya, Narasimhi accompanies Devi in the fight against demons Shumbha and Nishumba. There Narasimhi is described as a ferocious warrior: Narasimhi arrived there, assuming a body like that of a Narasimha throwing the stars into disarray, bringing down the constellations by the toss of her mane (DM: 20) . And, Narasimhi, filling all the quarters and the sky with her roars, roamed about in the battle, devouring other great asuras torn by her claws (DM: 37).

52.4. Narasimhi is sometimes identified with Pratyangira who is endowed with four arms and a face as terrible as that of a lion. Her head is that of a male lion and her body is that of a human-female. Her hair stands erect on her head. In her hands she holds a skull, trident, Damaru and the noose (nagapasa).  She is seated on a lion and by her power destroys all enemies.

52.5. In Tantric worship, Pratyangira is shown with a dark complexion, ferocious in aspect, having a lion’s face with reddened eyes and riding a lion wearing black garments, she wears a garland of human skulls; her hair strands on end, and she holds a trident, a serpent in the form of a noose, a hand-drum and a skull in her four hands. She is also associated with Bhairava, as Atharvana-Bhadra-Kali.

Sri Pratyangira Devi is also associated with Sri Chakra. She protects the devotees and guides him/her along the right path.

52.6. The Shaiva School suggests that Pratyangira sprung from the wings of Lord Sharabesha, the bird-lion-human form that Shiva assumed to pacify (subdue) the ferocious Narasimha.

[According to Kalikagama, the body of Sharabha should be that of a bird of golden hue, having two red eyes; and it should have two up-lifted wings and eight limbs. Sharabha, which is said to be mightier than an elephant, should have the fierce face of a lion grinning widely, having tusks and   wearing kirita makuta. The torso of Sharabha resembles that of human male having four hands .The lower part of its body should resemble that of a lion having four legs, sharp claws and a tail. Sharabha should be shown carrying the figure of Narasimha in his human form with upraised folded hands, anjali mudra. ]

Mahalakshmi

53.1. Mahalakshmi is counted as the eighth Matrika in the Asta-matrika tradition followed in the Nepal region. Mahalakshmi, as Matrka, is not derived from Devi Mahatmya, although she is described as “Universal Mother’ in other contexts. As Matrka, Mahalakshmi is regarded as an aspect of Durga; not as Lakshmi the consort of Vishnu. Mahalakshmi here represents her subtle aspect as Mind, specially her Sovereignty.

53.2. In the Shaktha tradition, Mahalakshmi is an independent Supreme Divinity manifesting herself as Maha-Sarasvathi (Sattva), Mahalakshmi (Rajas) and as Maha-Kali (Tamas).

Devi Mahatmya explains Mahalakshmi as Devi in her universal form as Shakthi. She is the primordial energy and was the first to appear before everything (sarva-sadhya); she is both devoid of form (nirakara) and filled with forms (sakara);   she is both manifest and un-manifest; She is the essence of all things (sarva sattva mayi). She creates and governs all existence (Isvari), and is known by various names (nana-abhidana-brut). She is the ultimate goal of yoga.  Mahalakshmi is the creator of the Trinity: Brahma, Vishnu and Rudra.

53.3. Mahalakshmi is the presiding Goddess of the Middle episode (Chapters 2-4) of Devi Mahatmya. In her manifestation as Mahalakshmi, the Devi destroys the demon Mahishasura. The Goddess fought the demon for nine days starting from prathipath (the first day of the brighter halfof the month of Ashvayuja; and killed the demon on the tenth day Vijaya-Dashami ending his reign of evil and terror. Her victory symbolizes the victory of good over evil.

53.4. Mahalakshmi described as having been created by the effulgence of all the gods is depicted as Ashtadasha Bhuja Mahalakshmi, with eighteen arms.

Skanda Purana (Sahyadri khanda) describes Mahalakshmi as: “She who springs from the body of all gods has a thousand or indeed countless arms, although her image is shown with eighteen hands. Her face is white made from the light streaming from the face of Shiva. Her arms are made of substance of Vishnu are deep blue; her round breasts made of Soma are white. Her waist is Indra and is red. Her feet sprung from Brahma are also red; while her calves’ and thigh sprung from Varuna are blue. She wears a gaily coloured lower garment, brilliant garlands and a veil. In her eighteen arms, starting from the lower left, she holds in her hands : a rosary, a lotus, an arrow, a sword, a hatchet, a club, a discus, an ax, a trident, a conch, a bell, , a noose, a sphere, a stick, a hide, a bow, a chalice and a water pot.”

The Chandi Kalpa adds that Mahalakshmi should be seated upon a lotus (saroja sthitha) and her complexion must be that of coral (pravala prabha).

54.4. When she is shown with four hands, Mahalakshmi is depicted as seated on a lotus throne, holding padma, shankha, a kalasha and a fruit (bilva or maatulunga). Her four hands signify her power to grant the four types (chatur vidha) of human attainments (purushartha): dharma, artha, Kama and moksha.

54.5. The Shilpa text Rupa-mandana suggests Mahalakshmi with four arms (chatur-bhuja) should be depicted in the colour of molten-gold (taptha-kanchana-sannibha) and decorated with golden ornaments (kanchana bhushana). She is also described as having complexion of coral; and seated on a lotus. Her four hands carry matulunga fruit, mace, shield and bowl of liquor. Her head must be adorned with snake-hood and a linga.

[Note: 1.

The head-gears mentioned for the Matrkas are commonly the Kirita -makutaKaranda-makuta and Jata-makutaMansara, the ancient text of Shilpa shastra, classifies these types of head-gears under the term makuta or mouli (MansaraMauli-lakshanam: 49; 1-232). For all makuta-s, the width commencing from the bottom should be gradually made lesser and lesser towards the top.

Among these, the Kirita-makuta is an elaborate crown that adorns major gods such as Vishnu and his forms (Narayana) and also emperors (Sarvabhouma).It has the appearance of Taranga-s (waves) and its middle is made into the shape of flowers and adorned with precious stones. The base of the Kirita-makuta should be curved like a crescent (ardha-chandra) just above the forehead. The height of the Kirita-makuta should be two or three times the length of the wearer’s face.

The Karanda-makuta is prescribed for lesser gods and for goddesses when depicted along with their spouse. It is simpler and shallower as compared to Kirita-makuta. The Karanda-makuta is a small conical cornet receding in tier. It is   shaped like an inverted flowerpot, tapering from the bottom upwards and ending in a bud. The width of a Karanda-makuta at the top should, however, be only one-half or one-third less than that at its base.

The jata- makuta is suitable according to Mansara for Brahma and Rudra, as also for consorts of Shiva. Jata-makuta, is made up of jata or matted locks, which are twisted into encircling braids of spiral curls and tied into a knot looped at the top. It is held in place by a patta (band); and is adorned with forest flowers and by a number of ornamental discs like the makara-kutapatra-kuta, and the ratna-kuta. In the case of Shiva, the jata-makuta is adorned with a crescent of the moon, a cobra and the Ganga.

In the case of Matrkas:  Vaishnavi and Aindri are adorned with kirita-makuta; Brahmi, Varahi and Kaumari with karanda-makuta; while Maheshwari and Chamunda are adorned with jata-makuta.

***

Note: 2.

Among the ayudhas carried by the Matrka deities the following are commonly mentioned: Khadga (Sword) ; Trishula (Trident) ; (Chakra Thunder – disc) Gada or Khitaka (Mace) ; Dhanush (Bow) ; Bana (Arrow ); Javelin (Bharji) ; Parashu (Battle- Axe) ;  Musula (pestle) ;  Danda (staff);khatvanga (skull-mace), khetaka or Sipar (shield); Ankusha (Goad) ; Sutra or Pasha(Noose or lasso); Damaru (drum); Panapatra (drinking cup); Ghanta (Bell) ; Akshamala (rosary) ;  Pustaka (book) ; kamandalu (water pot) ; and Vanamala (garland of forest-flowers ). ]

References and Sources

The iconography of the saptamatrikas: by Katherine Anne Harper: Edwin Mellen press ltd (1989-10)

Saptamatrka Worship and Sculptures by Shivaji K Panikkar; DK Print World (1997).

The Roots of Tantra by Katherine Anne Harper (2002)

Hindu Goddesses: Vision of the Divine Feminine in the Hindu Religious Traditions by David Kinsley; (1987)

Tribal Roots of Hinduism by SK Tiwari; Sarup and Sons (2002)

The Portrait of the Goddess in the Devī-māhātmya by David Kinsley

The Little Goddesses (Matrikas) by Aryan, K.C; Rekha Prakashan (1980)

Goddesses in Ancient India by P K Agrawala; Abhinav Publications (1984)

The Tantra of Sri Chakra by Prof. SK Ramachandra Rao ; Sharada Prakashana (1983)

Matrikas

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrikas

Sapta Matrikas and Matrikas

http://shaktisadhana.50megs.com/Newhomepage/Frames/forumframebodyindex.html

The mother goddess in Indian sculpture By Cyril Veliath

http://www.info.sophia.ac.jp/fs/staff/kiyo/kiyo37/veliath.pdf

Some discussions on the Skanda – Tantra and Balagrahas

http://manasataramgini.wordpress.com/2008/09/03/some-discursion-on-skanda-tantra-s-and-balagraha-s/

The Mahabharata of Krishna –Dwaipayana Vyasa (Book 3, Part 2) Section 229

http://www.bookrags.com/ebooks/12333/180.html

Devis of the first enclosure

http://shaktisadhana.50megs.com/Newhomepage/Frames/gallery/Khadgamala/1stenclosureB.html

All pictures are from Internet

 
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Posted by on October 7, 2012 in Devi, Saptamatrka

 

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Saptamatrka – Part Three

Continued from Part Two

Saptamatrka in texts

In the early references to Matrkas they are mentioned as groups of goddesses. Their numbers vary from text to text and from episode to episode. Their natures and dispositions too are varied.   They function as a group; and all references to them are as a group. They are generally characterized as inauspicious and dangerous.

Mahabharata

26. There is no mention of Matrkas in Ramayana. The earliest references to a group of Matrkas goddesses known as Matraha or Matragana appear in Mahabharata. Its Sections in Vanaparva and Shalyaparva – narrate various versions carrying copious descriptions of Matrka in the context of the conception, birth, abhishekha* and marriage of Skanda. Of the two sets of references, the one in Vanaparva is considered older and more helpful in understanding the concept of Balagraha. These narrations, in general, portray Matrkas as dangerous and fearsome goddesses.

[*The varied versions of Skanda’s origins seem to be shrouded in a range of tribal legends of martial nature. Skanda, it appears, established his superiority over many other gods by his sheer power; and was eventually accepted as their commander – in – chief, replacing Indra. To celebrate the occasion a formal Abhishekha was held.]

Vana parva

26.1. Vana-parva mentions a group of goddesses called Lokamata, Mothers – of – the world (Mbh: VP: 215.216). All the Lokamata, numbering about sixteenare said to be of inauspicious qualities and loathsome habits. Two of these goddesses are described. One of them (Vinata) is born of anger and carries a spike. The other (Lohitayani) – a daughter of sea, red in complexion and of bad temper – is said to live on blood. It is likely that the others in the group were also of inauspicious nature. They were sent by Indra to kill the newborn Skanda. When they approached the infant, their maternal instincts raise, their breasts ooze milk and they cannot bring themselves to kill Skanda, as commanded by Indra. They then request Skanda to adopt them as his mothers (215.18).

26.2. In the other accounts narrated in Mahabharata surrounding Skanda’s birth, a host of goddesses emerge from Skanda, when Indra strikes him with his thunderbolt (vajra). Skanda adopts all of them as his mothers and divides them into Shiva and a-Shiva, groups of good and evil spirits. The auspicious Matrkas – Devasena –   are said to be: Sasti, Laksmi, Asa, Sukhaprada, Sadvrtti, Aparajita, Sinivali and Khuhu. The eight ferocious and terrifying   goddesses of malicious nature given to stealing children (asiva-matrka) are: Kaki, Halima, Malini, Brhali, Arya, Brahmata, Palala and Vaimitra.

26.3. The dangerous nature of the Matrkas is elaborated in another version of the episode that is also related to the birth of Kartikeya or Skanda. It   says that the six wives of sages (among the wives of Sapta-rishis; excepting Arundhati) were alleged to be the biological mothers of Skanda; hence banished by their husbands on suspicion of being adulterous. The forlorn wives approach Skanda and beg him to adopt them as his mothers. He agrees to their request. The six ask Skanda to grant them two boons. One, to be recognized and worshipped by all as Maha-matrkas , Great Mothers; and two , to be allowed to pester and harm children , since they have been banished unjustly and have no further chance of bearing children. Skanda accepts to the first; but is reluctant to grant the second request as it pains him to see the children hurt. He asks Matrkas to protect children instead of harming them. They agree. But in the closing lines of that episode, Skanda allows the Matrkas to afflict children until their age of   sixteen: “In your various forms, you may torment children until they are sixteen. Thereafter you have to protect them“. Further, he grants them his terrible form Skanda-Apasmara (identified with Vishakaha) who torments (graha) children. They continue to have their violent nature. These six Rishi-patnis who turned into Matrkas are identified or associated with Krittika; the constellation of fiery nature [Pleiades (star cluster)] presided over by Agni. Skanda comes to be known also as Kartikeya or Krittikaputra or Krittikasuta.

[The classical literature mentions Krittikas as six. The earlier tradition counted them as seven. It was said: “The Krittikas are six. But when they ascended into heaven they became seven stars (Saptasirasabham)”.They are also known as many (bahula) emphasizing their plurality; and hence Skanda is celebrated as Bahuleya. The seven stars as named in Taittareya Brahmana (TB: 3.1.4.1) are: Amba; Dula; Nitatni; Abhrayanti; Meghayanti; Varshayanti; and Chupunika.]

26.4. Another list of ten female sprits is mentioned in the subsequent episode of the story. All of them serve inauspicious purposes; and have hideous forms. They are described as given to eating flesh, drinking strong intoxicants, prowling about in the confinement chamber where birth takes place. They torment pregnant women, and are also a threat to the newborn’s life, especially,   during its first ten days. They torment children until they are sixteen years of age in various ways; but later, they act as positive influences. The ten are named as: Vinata, Kadru, Putana, Shita Putana, Revathi, Diti, Surabhi, Sarama, Lohitayani and Arya. Elsewhere they are listed as: Sakuni, Revathi, Mukhamadika, Vinata, Putana, Sitaputana, Lohitayani and Sarama. They all are classified as grahas (seizers) or Rakkasi (demons) or Pisachas (ghouls). All but two of these (Vinata and Lohitayani) are blood thirsty. But, all harm pregnant women and attack children by surprise. Apart from these ten spirits, eighteen other grahas are mentioned, without naming them specifically.

26.5. Notable among the female spirits is Putana Rakshashi who appears in Bhagvata Purana as the stalker in the night and as one who kills children by poisoning them. She tried to kill the infant Krishna by suckling him with poisoned breast milk. But, she was eventually destroyed by Krishna. Another evil goddess Jara is mentioned in Sabha Parva (Mahabharata: 16.40-17.45).She joins together (sandhi) two pieces of a newborn and makes it into a whole baby-boy. He is named Jarasandha (the one who is put together by Jara); and he later becomes the powerful king of Magadha.

26.6. Among the other grahas, it is said, Sakuni harms children and Kadru assumes subtle forms to enter into pregnant women. The mothers of the afflicted children, praying for relief, are recommended to worship Karanjeya tree. Lohitayani, the daughter of Red sea, who nursed Skanda, is to be worshipped under Kadamba tree. Arya is to be worshipped for fulfilment of desires. All these goddesses that are harmful to children till they are sixteen are classified as the grahas of Kumara (Skanda).They are to be worshipped along with Skanda.

[Many have wondered about Matrka’s obsession to attack children. Some say; these beliefs originated in the fear that women who die childless or in childbirth might linger on as evil spirits envious of other women and their children. Matrkas are therefore feared. And that fear continues to haunt even today. The mothers are chary of talking too much about the charm and attraction of their   pretty looking little ones. It is not considered safe for children to attract the attention of the evil ‘eyes’ of the goddesses. And, sometimes; the mothers mark their well adorned children with a spot of collyrium or other dark substance on their cheeks to hide their beauty. These practices mixed with hope and fears are meant to safeguard the children .The mothers fondly hope to prevent spiteful goddesses from noticing their good-looking children, lest the jealous might harm the dear little children.]

The myth of the genesis of Skanda in the Vana parva of Mahabharata establishes the emergence of Skanda cult in association with the heterogeneous Matrkas. The same theme appears in the later Puranas. If read together, they outline the evolution and the widening of Skanda cult.

Shalya Parva

27.1. The Chapter 46 of Shalya Parva of Mahabharata narrates the elevation of Kartikeya as the Supreme Commander of the godly forces (Deva-senapathi). There is a long list of 213 Matrkas (the text says there are many more female beings whose names are not mentioned) or warriors who fight under the command of Kartikeya in his battles against the demons. Please click here for the list.

As a group, this host of female warriors is described in different ways. Mahabharata gives a graphic description of their appearances: Some of them are lovely to look at, with fair skin, cheerful and youthful; while the others are of inauspicious qualities and have long nails, broad teethe, red eyes and protruding lips, inspiring fear. They all fight valiantly like Indra in the battle.

27.2. It said; “These and many others Matrkas numbering by thousands… of diverse forms become the followers of Kartikeya. Their nails are long; their teeth are broad and their lips protruding. Of straight forms and sweet nature all of them endowed with youth, were decked in ornaments. Possessed of ascetic merit, they were capable of assuming any form at will. Not having much flesh on their limbs, they were dark and looked like clouds in hue and some were of the color of smoke. The braids of some were tied upwards; and the eyes of some were tawny; and some had girdles that were very long. Some had long stomachs, some had long ears; and some had long breasts. Some had coppery eyes and coppery complexion; and the eyes of some were green.

They all have their abode in inaccessible places away from human settlements, on trees and open spots and crossings of roads. They also live in caves and crematoriums, mountains and springs. They of hideous appearance are adorned with weird ornaments, they wear diverse kinds of attires and speak different strange languages. These and many other tribes of mothers are all capable of inspiring foes with dread, followed by high souled Kartikeya the chief commander of the celestials.” (Book 9: Shalya Parva: Section 46).

And some others were endued with the splendour of the morning sun and were highly blessed. Possessed of long tresses, they were clad in robes of white. Of invincible power and might their prowess was also invincible. Capable of granting boons and of travelling at will; they always were cheerful. Possessed of great strength, some amongst them partook of the nature of Yama, some of Rudra, some of Soma, some of Kubera, some of Varuna, some of Indra, and some of Agni. And some partook of the nature of Vayu, some of Kumara, some of Brahma, and some of Vishnu and some of Surya, and some of Varaha. Of charming and delightful features, they were beautiful like the asuras. In voice they resembled the kokila and in prosperity they resembled the Lord of Treasures. In battle, their energy resembled that of Shakra (Indra). In splendour they resembled fire. In battle they always struck their foes with terror. Capable of assuming any form at will, in fleetness they resembled the very wind. Of inconceivable might and energy, their prowess also was inconceivable.

27.3. Most other references in Mahabharata depict the Matrkas as inauspicious, fearful looking and dangerous to children. Though they eventually serve Kartikeya as his mother, their initial task was to kill him.

Devi Mahatmya

28.1. The first literary version of the group is mentioned in Devi Mahatmya. Here again, there are various versions about the origin of the Matrkas.

28.2. According to a latter episode of Devi Mahatmya and the one in Vamana Purana, Durga created Matrkas from herself; and with their help slaughtered the demon army.

28.3. In another important chapter of Devi Mahatmya, it is said, the Matrka goddesses were created by male Gods in order to aid Mahadevi in the battle against the demons Shumbha and Nishumbha. The Matrkas emerge as Shakthis from out of the bodies of the gods: Brahma, Shiva, Skanda, Vishnu and Indra. The texts describe their appearances and the destruction of the demons:

“Shakthis having sprung from the bodies of Brahma, Shiva, Skanda, Vishnu, and Indra; and having the form of each approached Chandika. Whatever, form, ornament and mount a particular god possessed, with that very form did his Shakthi go forth to fight the Asuras. In a heavenly conveyance drawn by swans with rosary and water pot came forth the Shakthi of Brahma: she is known as Brahmi. Maheshwari sallied forth, mounted on a bull, bearing the best of the tridents, with serpents for bracelets, adorned with the crescent of the moon. Ambika having the form of Guha (Skanda) as Kaumari went forth to fight the demons, with spear in hand, having the best of peacocks as her mount. Then Shakthi known as Vaishnavi went forth, mounted on Garuda, with conch, discus, club, bow and sword in her hand. The Shakthi of Hari who has the matchless form of a sacrificial Boar then came forth bearing the body of a sow. Narasimhi having the form like the man-lion then came forth with many a constellation cast down by the tossing of her mane. Then Aindri with thunderbolt in her hand, mounted upon the lord of elephants went forth; she had thousand eyes just like Indra. Then Shiva surrounded by the Shakthis of the gods said to Chandika: “may the demons quickly be slained by you in order to please me”. Then from the body of the Goddess came forth the frightening power of the Shakthi of Chandika herself, gruesome, yelping like thousand jackals. And she the invincible one spoke to Shiva of smoky matted locks:” You yourself become messenger to Shumbha and Nishumbha”.

[Because the Devi appointed Shiva himself as the messenger she gained renown as Shiva-duti.]

The Narayani Stuti, narrated in chapter 11 of the Devi Mahatmya, is sung with great gusto charged with intense devotion and a blessed sense of fulfilment. The verses 13 to 21 of Narayani Stuti are dedicated to Matrkas – Brahmi, Maheshwari, Kaumari, Vaishnavi, Varahi, Narasimhi, Indri, Shivaduti, and Chamnda. In salutations to the Matrkas, the verses describe, in brief, the splendour, virtues, powers and vahanas of these deities which are but the aspects of the Maha Devi, the Great Mother Goddess.

Salutations to you Oh Narayani who assumes the form of :  Brahmi riding celestial Chariot Yoked with Swans; Maheshwari adorned with the moon , riding the Great Bull and holding the trident; Kaumari of great virtue holding the powerful spear, surrounded by peacocks , cocks and bears; Vaishnavi the most excellent holding shankha , chakra , gadha and the dhanus; Varahi appearing as a ferocious Boar sporting awesome tusks , rescuing Mother Earth from her distress; Narasimhi as lioness in fearsome rage , destroying the enemies and protecting the three worlds; Indri the glorious queen of thousand eyes , destroyer of the Demon Vritra , in all her splendour decorated with a diadem and holding a blazing thunderbolt; Shivaduti roaring loudly  who sent Shiva himself as messenger and destroyed the Demons; and, Chamuda the most ferocious and invincible  with dreadful face and sharp protruding fangs , adorned with garland of severed heads, the destroyer of Demons Chanda and Munda.

.

Hamsa yukta Vimaansthey brahmaani rupa dharini!
Kau shaambhaha ksharikey devi narayani namosthu they!!

Trishula chandraahidhare mahaa vrisha bhavaahini !
Maaheswari swarupena narayani namosthu they!!

Mayura kukkuta vrithey mahaashakti dhare naghe!
Kaumaree rupa samsthaane narayani namosthu they!!

Shankachakra gadhaa shaangaha griheetha paramaayudhey !
Praseeda vaishnavi rupey narayani namosthu they!!

Griheetho gramaha chakra damshtro dhritha vasundarey!
Varaaha rupinee shive narayani namosthu they!!

Nara simha rupenogrena hanthu daithyaan krithodhyamey !
Triylokyathraana sahithey narayani namosthu they!!

Kireetini mahaavajrey sahasna nayanojwale !
Vrithapraana hare chaindri narayani namosthu they!!

Shiva dhoothee swarupena hathadaithya mahabale!
Ghorarupey mahaaraave narayani namosthu they!!

Damshtraa karaala vadaney shiromaalaa vibhooshaney!
Chamundey munda mathaney narayani namosthu they
!!

29.1. Following this episode, the later texts largely adopted the standard group of seven Matrkas consisting: Brahmi, Maheshwari, Kaumari, Vaishnavi, Varahi, Indrani and Chamunda. At times, Narasimhi is mentioned in place of Chamunda. The Varaha Purana names Yami – the Shakthi of Yama, the power of regulation and withdrawal as the seventh; and Yogishwari as the eighth Matrka, created by flames emerging from Shiva’s mouth. The Devi-Purana mentions nine Matrkas, by including Gana-nayika or Vinayaki – the Shakthi of Ganesha, and Mahabhairavi to the standard set of seven.

29.2. There is also a tradition of Ashtamatrikas, eight Matrkas, which is prevalent in Nepal region. In Nepal, the eighth Matrka is called Maha-Lakshmi (she is different from Vaishnavi). Narasimhi does not figure in the lists of Devi Purana and Nepal.

29.3. By about the seventh century Matrka’s and names and number– seven or eight- gradually began to get standardized. They took on the characteristic of their corresponding male gods; and came to be worshipped as Shakthis or energies of gods.

30.1. But, when you look across the various versions of the origins, evolution and development of the Matrkas you find that their names, numbers and attributes had been highly inconsistent. Most of the relevant texts that speak of the early stages of their development referred to Matrkas primarily as a group of goddesses, unspecified in number, inimical in nature and dangerous to children. None of the Matrka was significant in herself. The group was largely viewed and feared as hordes of malicious spirits harming pregnant women and children. In the later texts they were projected as troops of female warriors of ferocious nature assisting gods and goddesses in their battles against the demons. It was under the auspicious of the Tantra and Shaktha theology that the Matrkas were thoroughly reformed and rendered into worship-worthy benevolent mother-like goddesses of great spiritual merit.

30.2. Nevertheless, it would be interesting to put together, in one place, their names and numbers as they appear in various texts spread over the centuries.

Inconsistent names and numbers

Mahabharata

31.1. In Vana Parva of Mahabharata the Matrkas referred to as Lokamata of inauspicious qualities and habits are said to be a group of about sixteen.

31.2. In another episode narrated in Vana Parva when Indra strikes Skanda with his thunderbolt many Matrkas emerge from Skanda’s body. Skanda groups them into Shiva and a-Shiva, good and evil Matrkas.

31.3. The auspicious Matrkas –Devasenas- are said to be eight: Sasti, Laksmi, Asa, Sukhaprada, Sadvrtti, Aparajita, Sinivali and Khuhu.

31.4. Another version of the episode mentions the eight auspicious Matrkas as: Sinivali, Anumati, Raka, Gungu, Sarasvathi (Dhata), Indrani, Varunani and Khuhu. Among these, Raka (subhaga) the rich and bountiful granter of offspring and Sinivali the sister of gods (devanam svasa) are prominent, while Gungu is rather an obscure name; and some say, Gungu could be another name for Khuhu. All these goddesses are related with fertility, as also with different phases of the moon. Among these, Anumati personifies the night before the full -moon night; Raka the full–moon night; Sinivali the night before new-moon night; and Khuhu the new-moon night. And, later these goddesses also come to be identified with metres (Chhandus): Anumati with Gayatri; Raka with Trishtubh; Sinivali with Jagati; and Khuhu with Anushtubh.

31.5. The inauspicious Matrkas of malicious nature (asiva-matrka) are also said to be eight: Kaki, Halima, Malini, Brhali, Arya, Brahmata, Palala and Vaimitra. In some versions the names of Raudra and Rshabha are added.

31.6. From among the groups of goddesses who came to be associated with the birth of Skanda the most important are the Krittikas. Another legend in Vana Parva of Mahabharata says that the six who were the wives of sages (among the Sapta-rishis) were accepted by Skanda as his mothers. And they prayed to Skanda to be named as   Maha-matrkas, Great Mothers. These six goddesses are identified or associated with the constellation Krittika, presided over by Agni. It is said; The Krittikas are six. But when they ascended into heaven they became seven stars (Saptasirasabham): [Amba; Dula; Nitatni; Abhrayanti; Meghayanti; Varshayanti; and Chupunika.].

31.7. Yet another list of ten Matrkas, inauspicious grahas (seizers) having hideous forms are mentioned in Vana Parva of Mahabharata. They are named as: Vinata, Kadru, Putana, Shita Putana, Revathi, Diti, Surabhi, Sarama, Lohitayani and Arya. Another version lists them as seven: Revathi, Mukhamadika, Vinata, Putana, Sitaputana, Lohitayani and Sarama. Apart from these, eighteen other grahas are mentioned, without naming them specifically.

31.8. Shalya Parva of Mahabharata provides a long list of 213 Matrkas associated with Skanda (the text says there are many more that are not mentioned).These Matrkas are troops of female warriors who fight under the command of Skanda (Deva-senapathi).

Puranas

32.1. In the Devi Mahatmya the Saptamatrkas (seven Matrkas) mentioned are: Brahmi, Maheshvari, Kaumari, Vaishnavi, Varahi, Indrani and Chamunda. At times, Narasimhi is mentioned in place of Chamunda.

32.2. In some versions the, Martkas are counted as eight (Ashta-Matara) by including Narasimhi.

32.3. Nepal follows the tradition of eight Matrkas (Ashta Matara) but it counts Maha-Lakshmi as the eighth Matrka and omits Narasimhi.

32.4. Devi Bhagavata Purana (Book five; Chapter 28) while describing the battles fought by the Devi names ten Matrkas; and mentions that the Shakthis of the other gods (the wives of Kubera, Varuna, and other Devas) also came there with proper forms and joined the battle. The ten Matrkas mentioned are: Brahmi; Vaishnavi; Maheshwari; Kaumari; Indrani; Varahi; Narasimhi; Kalika; Shiva-duti; and Chandika.

32.5. Devi Bhagavata mentions that when Parvati approached to bless Skanda, she was accompanied by six Matrkas: Gauri, Vidya, Gandhari, Kesini, Mitra and Savitri.

32.6. Devi-Purana mentions nine Matrkas, by including Gana-nayika or Vinayaki – the Shakthi of Ganesha; and Mahabhairavi – Shakthi of Bhairava, to the standard list of Saptamatrkas.

32.7. Devi Purana also describes a pentad of Matrkas (Matra-panchaka), who help Ganesha in killing the demons. The five mothers named are: Kaumari, Rudrani, Chamunda, Brahmi and Vaishnavi.

32.8. The Varaha Purana names Yami – the Shakti of Yama, as the seventh; and Yogishwari created by flames emerging from Shiva’s mouth, as the eighth Matrka. These two replace Indrani and Narasimhi.

32.9. Vamana Purana (57; 27-29) gives a long list of 49 Matrkas accompanying Skanda.

32.10. Agni Purana (299.4950) mentions 38 female divinities. Of these, the Balagraha that affect the children day-wise are called Putana; and those that affect children year-wise are called Sukumarika.

Tantra

33.1. The Tantra counts nine Matrkas by including Chandika and Mahalakshmi to the standard list of Saptamatrkas (Brahmi, Maheshvari, Kaumari, Vaishnavi, Varahi, Indrani and Chamunda).The Yoginis, who are the attendants of the Goddess Devi, are regarded as daughters of the Matrkas. Each Matrka is said to have nine daughters, thus bringing up a total of eighty-one Yoginis.

However, the tradition following the cluster of eight Matrkas (Kaula Tantra) counts sixty-four Yoginis (Chaushatti Jogini); each Matrka having eight daughters. And, each of the 64 yoginis is also associated with currents or ‘winds’ in human astral body.

[In certain traditions, each Matrika is also a yogini. The Tribal roots of Hinduism by Shri Shiv Kumar Tiwari (page 129-130) mentions that Mother goddesses are categorized in two ways. In one, as given in Kalika –purana, Matrkas and yoginis are listed together; they are of same family (kula). And, the other list (as given in Agni-purana) excludes Matrkas. The former list assigns high position to yoginis, while the other list relegates yoginis to lower positions. The list of 64 yoginis (which excludes Matrkas) belongs to the latter category. ]

[Incidentally, in the Tantra–tradition, the eight Matrkas represent the eight tattvas, the eight powers of the manifested universe. At the micro level, the eight Matrkas are said to manifest (prakata)  in their gross form (stula-rupa) as  eight body-constituents : skin (Brahmi); blood (Maheshwari); muscle (Kaumari); fat-tissue (Vaishnavi);bone (Varahi);bone-marrow (Indrani);semen (Chamunda);and vitality (Mahalakshmi) . Another text Sethu-bandha (8 – 123) mentions that the eight are located in the human body at the : meet of the eyebrows (Brahmi);breasts (Maheshwari);navel (Kaumari);heart (Vaishnavi);face (Varahi); nose (Indrani);neck((Chamunda) and forehead (Mahalakshmi).

Even otherwise the number eight has a special significance in the Tantra.  It is associated with: the eight directions with four cardinal and four intermediate points (digbandahs); the eight types of  yogic  powers  or attainments (siddhis); the eight primary mystic symbols (mudras) ; the eight limbs  of Yoga (astanga) ; and of course eight forms of the Divine Mother (Matrkas) .Further , the 64 (8×8) celled square Manduka/ Chandita Mandala is regarded as the Mandala of the Siddhas where in its 64 chambers (kalas) Shiva and Shakthi reside (Thirumandiram V. 1418).]

33.2. The Uttara Tantra Shastra (Chapter 27) names eight graha-s (seizers) as: Skanda-apasmara (Vishakaha), Shakuni, Revathi, Putana, Andhaputana, Shitaputana, Ukhamandika, and Naigamesha.

33.3. The Shakthi – sangama – Tantra (Upatti-khanda) gives a list of fifty Matrika kalas : Nivritti, Pratishtita, Vidya , Shanthi , Indhika , Dipika , Mochika , Para , Sukshma , Sukshmamrita , Jnanamrita , Apyayani , Vyapini , Vyomarupa , Ananta , Srishti , Riddhi , Smriti , Medha , Kanti , Lakshmi , Dyuthi , Sthira , Sthithi , Siddhi , Jada , Palini , Shanthi , Aishvarya , Rati , Kamika , Varada , Ahladini , Prithi , Dirgha , Tikshna , Raudri , Bhaya , Nidra , Tadra , Kshudha , Krodini , Kriya , Utkari , Mrityurupa , Pita , Sheveta , Asita , and Ananta.

Other references

34.1. Utpala (ninth century) commentator of Varahamihira‘s (fifth – sixth century) Brihat Samhita refers to Matrganah, the group of eleven Matrkas as Brahmi, Vaishavi, Raudri, Kaumari, Aindri, Yami, Varuni, Kuberi, Narasimhi , Varahi and Vinayaki.

34.2. The Devi Puja vidhi (a religious text of the middle centuries) mentions sixteen Matrkas (Shodash Matrika) and names the sixteen as : Gauri; Padma; Sachi ; Medha; Savitri ; Vijaya; Jaya ; Devasena; Svaha;   Svadha ; Matru : lokamatru; Dhriti; Pusti; Tushti; Kuladevi.

[The Shodash Matrika along with Ganapathy are invariably worshipped at the commencement of the marriage rituals.]

34.3. There are two other lists of the Shodash Matrkas:

: Savitri; Gayatri; Sarasvathi; Jaya; Thristi; Megha; Puasti ; Tushti ; Dhriti; Vijaya; Devasena; Svadha; Svaha ; Matara; Lokamatara; Kuladevi.

: SavitriI; Kaumari; Rudrani ; Brahmani ; Gayatri; Tridhi ; Dhiriti; Vijaya; Jaya; Chandravigraha; Bhima; Chamunda; Varahi; Indrani; Narayani; and Narasimhi.

34.4. The Puja Vidhi also mentions seven home deities Grihamatrikas: Lakshmi; Shree; Dhriti; Medha; Pragya; Svaha; Sarasvathi.

35.1. Thus, the numbers, names and the order of the Matrkas have been highly inconsistent throughout. These are spread across the centuries covering their varied appearances, such as: the Balagraha, the female warriors, Krittikas, the mothers related to Skanda legend, Purana-deities, Tantra–shakthis, ritual-goddesses, the Vedic heptads etc. But, their numbers were eventually restricted to seven; and a set of Saptamatrkas was accepted as the standard. Such crystallization of the Saptamatrka possibly occurred in the late fourth century or early fifth century.

saptamatrikas

Why Seven?

36.1. Some argue that the restriction of the number of Matrkas to seven is somewhat arbitrary. But, there also are many explanations which try to rationalize the formation of the close knit group of seven. These elucidations are essentially based in the Vedic belief in heptads.

36.2. It is said; the idea of Matrka as group of seven goddesses is linked fundamentally to the Vedic preference for number seven; and to the symbolisms associated with heptads. The other ancient cultures such as Babylonians, Greeks and Hebrew seemed to have similar fixations with the number seven.

In the Vedic context, seven was conceptually rendered into a single unit. It represented the sense of completeness. To go beyond number seven was to be born into a new sphere of existence; either to enter into a new cycle or to enter into a higher order of existence. Seven was employed as a notional unit to count, to gauge and to map out the material world as also the components of life. Structuring the world into units of seven seemed to be an attempt to impose order on the seemingly chaotic.

36.3. The Vedic people therefore viewed the world around them as composed of units of seven. For instance, the Universe was understood as having seven layers , each with seven Adityas (Suns) ; and the Sun’s rays having seven colours (sapta varna). Similarly ,the planet earth was seen as made of: seven islands (sapta-dweepa-Vasundhara); seven regions (sapta loka); seven communities (sapta kula); seven seas (sapta samudra); seven mountains (sapta parvatha); seven deserts (sapta arania); seven cities (sapta pura); and seven holy trees (sapta vriksha) and so on.

36.4. The number seven was found significant in understanding the composition of human body , which is made of seven types of substances (sapta dhatu); seven senses (sapta indriya); seven energy centres including the final Sahasrara chakra (sapta chakra); seven phases of existence or seven states of consciousness (Bhu; Bhuvaha ; Suvaha; Mahaha; Janaha; Tapaha and Satyam)  and so on.

36.5. The Vedic poets composed verses in seven meters (sapta-chandasmi) having seven syllables (saptaream bhavathi) and sang in seven notes (sapta swara).Their most highly respected sages were seven (sapta rishi) . In certain yajnas seven altars were constructed (sapta-chitikagni) and altars had seven layers of bricks. Agni has seven tongues of flames.

36.6. The most important aspect of Vedic life was its perennial river systems. The seven rivers Sapta Sindhu (Iravathi, Chandrabhaga, Vitasta, Vipasa, Satadru, Sindhu and Sarasvathi) were venerated as the life giving Mothers; and, Sarasvathi was the best of the mothers. It was from the depths of these waters that life arose; and the sun emerged and ascended the sky. Those waters   were not mere physical features of their land; but were the very source of their life, of their divinities and of the meaning to their life. All their songs, myths and legends surround these seven rivers, the seven mothers (sapta matarah).

37.1. It was not therefore surprising that in the later ages when attempting to bring in a sense order into the chaotic world of Matrkas the ancient unit of seven was employed. It signified authenticity and ‘completeness’. It also, perhaps, suggested belief in the auspiciousness of odd numbers. And, by refining their natures, attributes and appearances; and by linking them to the older Vedic concept of the heptads, the Matrkas were invested with an aura of sacredness and spiritual authority.

37.2. Just as the seven mother-like rivers (sapta matarah) of Rig Veda, the Saptamatrkas, the mother-like goddesses, came to be characterized by their maternal nature and movement. The concept of Saptamatrka, the seven mothers, is thus an extension of the idea of visualizing the seven rivers as mothers. The Krittika constellation, incidentally, marked the beginning of a new yearly time cycle. Krittikas the Mothers of Skanda are, thus, also the mothers of time and of regeneration; and are initiators of the next epoch.

Iconography

38.1. The iconography of Saptamatrkas presents a very interesting study. Normally, an icon or image of a god or a goddess is visualized and presented in a standard form following the descriptions of its attributes, dispositions, postures and features as narrated in the related texts. And, the salient aspects of the icon–to be-sculpted are, usually, epitomized into pithy Dhyana Slokas, for the guidance of the Shilpi.

38.2. But in the case of the Matrkas, their concepts, appearances and nature change rapidly from period to period, from text to text and from tradition to tradition. Their individual portrayals too vary from their group presentations. When portrayed individually they are depicted as benevolent and graceful mother-like goddesses. But, in group they appear as warriors; and their names and numbers also differ. Further, there are the regional variations in their depictions. These again are guided by the then current theological interpretations, the sculptural styles of the period and the ingenuity of the sculptors. Thus, when you look across their evolution and development spread over the centuries you find there is no single standardized universally recognizable form of the Matrkas. Each period, each region and each tradition developed its own iconographic interpretations.

38.3. Another interesting feature of Matrka- iconography is that their sculptural depictions are in no way linked to their descriptions narrated in the Puranas and other literary sources. The icons are hardly related to the narrative content. The Matrkas of the Puranas are invariably gruesome warrior females fighting the Demons. The ferocious, blood-drinking Matrkas are not referred to as mothers; nor is there a reference to their ‘motherly-qualities’. The early Balagraha deities called as Matrkas in the Kushana period were dangerous to children .Even the Matrkas associated with Skanda were inimical to children up to their age of five or sixteen. Thus, there is an obvious mismatch between the Matrkas described in the Puranas and the sculptural depictions of ‘mother-goddesses’ of the later periods.

38.4. It is only in the post-Gupta period and the medieval centuries the numbers, names and natures of the Matrkas started getting standardized .That was mainly due to the influence of the Tantra and Shaktha cults. In the depictions that followed thereafter, Matrkas were portrayed as goddesses, radiant, graceful, benevolent and caring mothers. Each Matrka came to be associated with a particular divine or mystic aspect in Tantra or Yoga. In sculptures, their motherliness was often emphasized by their playful attitude towards the children they carried on their laps. But, they held on to the weapons of war. And, yet their associated symbolisms were retained; harmony in their overall structure and countenance were ensured. The later Sculptures of mother goddesses exhibit aesthetic maturity and divine charm

39.1. The coexistence of male and female principles in the Saptamatrka depictions is yet another instance of dichotomy. Sometimes; Matrkas are described as feminine forces that derive their names and attributes from male gods. Hence, they are taken to imply the coexistence of male and female principles. Yet the female is dominant. In fact, the male is completely replaced. It is the feminization of the male personalities. Shaktha tradition achieves this through transformation of the already existing male gods into independent goddesses, female principles, Shakthis; thus, reinventing an absolutely new conception of a Goddess.

39.2. Speaking of the later times, the general descriptions of the Matrkas are given in various other  texts. The vast body of references includes Purana, Agama, Tantra and Shilpa texts. The various texts of Shipa shastra:

Aparajitaprccha, Rupamandana and Manasollasa provide iconography – details of Matrka sculptures. There is, of course, the authoritative  Vishudharmottara. Further, Agamas like Amsumadbhedagama,  Surabhedagama  and Ruruvarnagama also contain instructions  for making Matrka images.  In addition, several Tantra texts such as Svachhanda  Tantra and Yogini Hridaya contain detailed  descriptions of the Saptamatrkas.

39.3. Brihat-samhita (sixth century) says that the Matrka images are to be made with the emblems, banners, ayudhasvahanas and ornaments that are associated with the male gods after whom they are named. Brahmi should be sculpted like Brahma; Maheshwari like Maheshwara; Vaishnavi like Vishnu; Varahi with boar-face like Varaha; Indrani (Aindri) like Indra; and Kaumari like Skanda. But, Chamunda is herself, a terrifying war goddess with dishevelled hair and fearsome countenance.

40.1. The following is a brief summary of the Matrka descriptions as given, mainly, in Rupamandana, in Aparajitapuccha of Bhuvanadeva and in Vishudharmottara:

When the Matrkas are sculpted on a panel or arranged in a row they should be placed between Gananatha and a form of Shiva such as Vinadhara or the fierce Bhairava or Virabhadra at the other end. All the Matrkas are to be seated (asana) in comfortable lalithasana with the right leg stretched down (lambaka padam) and the left leg bent and kept on the seat (sayanam padakam); or in ardhaparyankasana with the right leg folded and the left bent perched on the edge of the seat; or in the formal padmasana .All are shown seated on their respective vahanas. Sometimes, the child-motif is etched on the pedestal or a child is placed on their laps [In many south Indian sculptured panels of later times the child or the child-motif is not depicted].

Two of their hands gesture protection (abhaya) and blessing (varada) while their other hands hold weapons and emblems associated with their male counterparts. They are well adorned with ornaments like a suitable simple crest (makuta or mouli) or a wreath of flowers around jatamakuta, flower garlands (vanamala), necklaces (haara), circular ear-rings (rathna kundala), simple armlets (ekavali), bracelets, anklets, jewelled waist-bands (kati–mekhala or kati-bandha) etc. “Matrikas should be endowed with beautiful breasts, a slender waist and full hips so that female beauty may be celebrated.”

40.2. In the row of seated Matrkas, Brahmi is depicted as bright as gold, four faced riding swan (hamsa) holding akshamalapusthaka and kamandalu. Maheshwari fair in complexion, her hair (jatamakuta) adorned with crescent moon rides a bull holding in her six hands akshamalashula, khadgakhatvanga and maatulinga fruit (a kind of sweet lime with seeds inside). Vaishnavi of dark complexion with a lovely face, adorned with ornaments and garlands of flowers (vanamala) rides Garuda , holds shankha, chakra, gadha, and padma; and in her two other hands gestures abhaya and varada. The six faced Kaumari rides a peacock and holds in her ten hands shakthi, dwaja, danda, dhanus, bana, akshamala, kukkuda and kamandalu; and in her other two hands gestures varada and abhaya. Varahi of the complexion of storm-cloud, boar-faced rides a buffalo holding danda, khadga, khetaka and pasha. Aindri of red complexion is seated on an elephant holding sutra, vajra, kalasha and paatra. Chamunda of dark red complexion, deep-set eyes, fierce looks, dishevelled hair bristling upwards, emaciated body, bright tusk-like teeth; wearing garland of skulls , rides a preta ghoul holding a trishula, kapala, khatvanga and fire.

40.3. The descriptions summarized above are rather the classic features as narrated in texts. But, in most cases when Matrkas are etched in a row over temple walls or in small niches, they all are made to look alike with a single face each. They are distinguished from each other by the ayudhas they carry or the emblems (lanchanas) etched below the figures on countersunk panels. In some cases, each Matrka might be provided with a child; either in the lap or made to stand by the side. The group usually is flanked by Vinayaka and Virabhadra.

Let’s look at the Matrkas, individually, in the next part.

Continued in Part Four

References and Sources

The iconography of the saptamatrikas: by Katherine Anne HarperEdwin Mellen press ltd (1989-10)

Saptamatrka Worship and Sculptures by Shivaji K Panikkar; DK Print World (1997).

The Roots of Tantra by Katherine Anne Harper (2002)

Hindu Goddesses: Vision of the Divine Feminine in the Hindu Religious Traditions by David Kinsley; (1987)

Tribal Roots of Hinduism by SK Tiwari; Sarup and Sons (2002)

The Portrait of the Goddess in the Devī-māhātmya by David Kinsley

The Little Goddesses (Matrikas) by Aryan, K.C; Rekha Prakashan (1980)

Goddesses in Ancient India by P K Agrawala; Abhinav Publications (1984)

The Tantra of Sri Chakra by Prof. SK Ramachandra Rao; Sharada Prakashana (1983)

Matrikas:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrikas

Sapta Matrikas and Matrikas

http://shaktisadhana.50megs.com/Newhomepage/Frames/forumframebodyindex.html

The mother goddess in Indian sculpture By Cyril Veliath

http://www.info.sophia.ac.jp/fs/staff/kiyo/kiyo37/veliath.pdf

Some discussions on the Skanda – Tantra and Balagrahas

http://manasataramgini.wordpress.com/2008/09/03/some-discursion-on-skanda-tantra-s-and-balagraha-s/

The Mahabharata of Krishna –Dwaipayana Vyasa (Book 3, Part 2) Section 229

http://www.bookrags.com/ebooks/12333/180.html

Devis of the first enclosure

http://shaktisadhana.50megs.com/Newhomepage/Frames/gallery/Khadgamala/1stenclosureB.html

 All pictures are from Internet

 
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Posted by on October 7, 2012 in Devi, Saptamatrka

 

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Saptamatrka – Part One – Devi

 

This article is primarily about the Matrkas the mother-like deities. But, I cannot resist talking about Devi the Great Goddess. Let’s dwell on Devi for a while before we proceed to the Matrkas.

goddess_maha_shakti_hi49 (1)

Mother

1.1. The concept and worship of God as Mother dates back to the hoary past. And, it continues to represent a very important but intricate aspect of the Indian philosophies, religions, arts and literatures. The faith in Mother Goddess permeates the consciousness of Indian people at all levels. And, it has influenced all segments, emotional aspects and intellectual ideologies of Indian life. Even the Indian landmass is idealized and pictured as Bharat-Mata, as a tall beautiful woman with long flowing hair, dressed in a sari, wearing a crown upon her head and holding a trishul in her hand. The vision of nation as Mother that charged the hearts of the 19th and early 20th century patriots and freedom fighters is epitomized by the immortal anthem ’Vande Mataram’. And, indeed the whole of the earth is looked upon as Dharti-mata.

1.2. But, in essence, the archetype Mother-images don’t really refer to any concrete or physical Mother existing in space and time. But, it truly is a yearning towards an inward image of Mother in our collective psyche. It’s symbolic expressions abound in myths, legends, rites and arts of various types spread over the ages across the regions, sects and sub sects that make what we now call India. They also pervade our private worlds of dreams, fantasies and emotional outbursts, finding their expressions in myriad forms of creative art – the sublime as also the sick. They exist/existed in all classes of societies, matriarchic or patriarchic or otherwise.

Devi Mahatmya

Manuscript of the Devimahatmya

[While you read, you might like to listen to Mahalaya rendered by Shri Birendra Krishna Bhadra. Please RIGHT click here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXDnhN-hPT4]

2.1. Most of the Puranas, it is believed, were rendered into written form by about 250 AD, though the exact periods are not known. The Gupta period (400-600 AD) hailed as the Golden Age witnessed innovations in art and literature. It was the age of revivalism. This was also the period when Puranas were expanded or reinterpreted. This literarily production was ground breaking. It brought the lore of gods and goddesses closer to common people. Each Purana was dedicated to the glorification of a particular god such as Vishnu or Shiva. However, some Puranas devoted exclusive chapters to narrate the legends of the Great Goddess Devi. One such Maha-purana was Markandeya-purana (Ca.250-400 CE). In its Section of thirteen chapters – Devi Mahatmya- it celebrated the glory of Devi as the Great Mother the Supreme Deity.

[ Please do read the detailed analysis of the Devi MahatmyaThe Glory of the Goddess-Devi Mahatmyam by Dr. Satya Prakash Choudhary

Please check here for Sri Durga Saptashati in translation; and , check here for an analysis of the structure of Sri Durga Saptashati ; both prepared by the researcher Mr. Ranjan , Mukesh]

2.2. Of all the Indian texts, the Devi Mahatmya, in particular, has been instrumental in establishing the all comprehensive nature of the Mother as the Supreme God, Mahadevi – the Great Goddess. Some believe, the text is the starting point for investigating into the nature of feminine transcendence. She is the Power – spiritual, moral, mental, biological, and psychological as well as physical. It is believed that Devi Mahatmya brings together various ancient traditions of female deities and their worship. The Devi Mahatmya celebrates, in particular, the glory of the Mother and her martial deeds. It adulates Devi as the greatest warrior; and rejoices Devi as Chandi the destroyer of evil and its tendencies. She is the protector of the world from demons; and she does so from time to time by assuming various forms. She is also Ambika the mother who protects; and also Durga the goddess who saves us from all sorts of miseries and difficulties. And, it is She who, just as a boat, takes the devotees across oceans of existence (Bhava-Tarini). Her splendour and beauty is sung   and exalted by countless other names and forms. The text is the celebration of the limitless powers and the splendour of the Mother Goddess. It affirms its faith that   the ultimate power and authority in the Universe reside in Devi. She encompasses and overrides everything in the Universe. She is the ultimate reality.    Devi Mahatmya asserts its faith that her Ultimate reality is really the ultimate; and it is not merely feminine.

2.3. The Devi Mahatmya dated somewhere around the fourth- fifth century , also renowned as Durga SaptasatiDurgapathaChandi, Chandipatha or Chandi Saptashati, is composed as a long poem of seven hundred verses (Saptashathi) ** arranged over thirteen   chapters which are grouped into three sections: Prathama Charitra, Madhyama Charitra and the Uttama Charitra. It is accompanied by glorious   hymns in praise of the Mother Goddess and her Shaktihis who descend upon earth from time to time to rid the world of demons and evil-doers. The Devi Mahatmya centered on Devi (as mentioned earlier) is originally a section (chapters 81-93) of the Markandeya Purana. The importance of Devi Mahatmya is so huge and its uniqueness so significant that it has come to be recognized as independent of its parent text. Over the centuries, the Devi Mahatmya has acquired a number of subsidiary texts (anga) that are mainly concerned with the ritual worship of the Devi.

The thirteen chapters of the Devi Mahatmya, the Chandi, are grouped into three sections comprising of three major episodes (caritras), each one describing the glory of one of the three different aspects of the Supreme Goddess; the three Goddesses identified as Maha-Kali, Mahālakṣhmī and Maha-Sarasvathi. The three forms of the Devi correspond to three Gunas: Maha-Sarasvathi (Sattva), Mahālakṣhmī (Rajas) and Maha-Kali (Tamas). Although they are represented as three distinct images, they are virtually one; and, this is true not only for the three Goddesses, but also for all other forms of the  Maha Devi , the Supreme Goddess.

[**There are 537 Sloka mantras (full Slokas); 38 Ardha-sloka mantras (half Slokas); 66 khanda mantras (part of a Sloka); 57 Uvacha mantras; and, 2 Punarukta mantras, totalling 700 altogether. The number 700 is thus not related to the number of verses, but indicates the total number of mantras in the Devi Mahatmya. Though the details of the breakup of the mantras is not important for simple recitation, these details are important for Chandi Homa, Japa and Archana.]

Navaratri

The unique feature of Devi Mahatmya is its oral tradition and the intense devotional fervor of its hymns. And, therefore the entire text is revered as a Mantra*.   Its popularity is immense. It is recited for averting calamities   in life; and at dire times when the country is under threat of attack; as also for overcoming impurities: Mala, Vikshepa and Avarana. And, as the text itself says, it bestows not only temporal prosperity but also illumination by destroying the darkness of Avidya.  The recitation of Devi Mahatmya is an integral part of the Devi-worship celebrations performed during Sharad Navaratri and Chandi Yajna; as also of Tantric Sadhana involving   Sat-chakra – behda.  The Dura-puja festivities commence with the recitation of Devi Mahatmya on the night of the last day of pitri-paksha (the fortnight of the Pitris).

[* Sri Swami Krishnananda explains “The Devi Mahatmya is treated as if it were a Mantra   . Each of its episodes (charita) is associated with a Rishi (the sage who visualised it) , a chandas (its meter), a presiding deity ( pradhna-devata), and viniyoga (for japa).He further says that every sloka of the Devi-Mahatmya is a Mantra by itself. For instance, the opening sloka of Devi Mahatmya: “Savarnih suryatanayo yo manuh Kathyate-shtamah” is ordinarily taken to mean “Listen to the story of the king who is the eighth Manu” .But, it is in fact a mantra, he says; and its Tantric interpretation is: “Now, I shall describe to you the glory of Hreem“. The Swami explains; Ha is the eighth letter from among: Ya, Ra, La, Va, Sya, Sha, Sa, and Ha. And add to that ‘Ram’ the Bija of Agni and one hook to make ‘Hreem’. Here, Hreem is the Bija-mantra of Devi; and, is equivalent to Pranava mantra Om. ]

The text of the Devi Mahatmya also celebrates the glory and splendour of the auspicious Devi in four sublime hymns. Bhaskararaya Makhin (18th century) regards these hymns as Sruti-s (revealed wisdom), the exalted revealed (Drsta) knowledge, equalling the Vedas, than as made, the Krta.

The four hymns are:

:- Brahma-stuti (DM. 1.73-87) starting with tvaṃ svāhā tvaṃ svadhā tvaṃ hi vaṣaṭkāraḥ svarātmikā;

:- the Sakaradi-stuti (DM.4.2-27) starting with śakrādayaḥ suragaṇā nihate’tivīrye;

:- the Aparajita –stuti (DM.5.9-82) starting with namo devyai mahādevyai śivāyai satataṃ nama ; and,

:- the Narayani-stuti (DM.11. 3-35) starting with devi prapannārtihare prasīda.

These hymns describe the nature and character of the Goddess in spiritual terms:

The Brahma-stuti (DM.1.73-87) also known as the Tantrika Ratri Suktam, establishes the Divine Mother’s ultimate transcendence and her identity her as the creator and sustainer and the dissolver of the Universe. She is all compassing source of the good and the evil, alike; both radiant splendour and terrifying darkness. And yet, she ultimately is the ineffable bliss beyond all duality.

In the longest and most eloquent of the Devi Mahatmya’s four hymns, richly detailed Sakaradi-stuti (DM.4.3-27) Indra and other gods praise Durga’s supremacy and transcendence. Her purpose is to preserve the moral order, and to that end she appears as ’good fortune in the dwelling of the virtuous; and, misfortune in the house of the wicked’, granting abundant blessings and subduing misconduct (DM.4.5). ‘Every intent on benevolence towards all’ (sarvo-upakāra-karaṇāya sadārdracittā DM.4.17), she reveals even her vast destructive power as ultimately compassionate, for in slaying those enemies of the world who ‘may have committed enough evil to keep them long in torment’ (kurvantu nāma narakāya cirāya pāpam – DM.4.18) , she redeems them with the purifying touch of her weapons so that they ‘may attain the higher worlds’ (lokānprayāntu ripavo’pi hi śastrapūtā/ itthaṃ matirbhavati teṣvahiteṣusādhvī –DM.4.19).

The Devas , distressed that the Asuras have re-grouped and once again overturned the world-order , invoke the Devi in a magnificent hymn , the Aparajita-stuti or Tantrika Devi Suktam, the twenty slokas beginning with ‘ya devi sarva bhuteshu , praise to the invincible Goddess , which celebrates her immanent presence in the Universe as the consciousness that manifests in all beings (yā devī sarvabhūteṣu cetanetyabhidhīyate) . Thereupon the Devi appears on the banks of the Ganga. Her radiant manifestation emerging from the body of Parvathi embodies the Guna of Sattva, the pure energy of light and peace. Later, She takes on multiple and varied forms in the course of the battle with the Asuras.

The final hymn, the Narayani-stuti (DM.11.3-35) lauds the Devi in her universal, omnipresent aspect and also in the diverse expressions of her powers .Thereupon, the Devi  assures to protect all existence and to intervene whenever evil arises.

Devi

2.4. Devi Mahatmya is not a Tantric text; but is the basic text for the Shaktha cult. The Shaktha theology was derived from the triad of: the primacy of Prakrti as in Samkhya; the monistic Brahman as in Advaita; and, the ritualism of Tantra. It staunchly believes in the supremacy of the female principle. And, it idealizes Devi the Mother Goddess in most abstract philosophical terms as Shakthi the primal energy of all (sarvamayi) that is manifest (jadathmika) and un-manifest (Arupa). She is beyond all forms and gunas, but assumes them to create and operate the world.

At another level, the Shaktas  worship the Devi Durga , who is beyond, as an independent Supreme Divinity. She is the primordial energy and was the first to appear before everything (sarva-sadhya); She is both devoid of form (nirakara) and filled with forms (sakara);   She is both manifest and unmanifest; She is the essence of all things (sarva sattva mayi). She creates and governs all existence (Isvari), and is known by various names (nana-abhidhana-brut). She is the Mother of the worlds (Jagadamba) and sustainer of the worlds (Jagad-dhatri).  Everything in the universe is a minute expression her inscrutable power (Yoga Maya). She is the ultimate goal of yoga.  She is the creator of the Trinity: Brahma, Vishnu and Rudra.

The Rishi sumits to the Supreme Goddess  Chaṇḍikā : Oh Devi of incomparable greatness and power ; who cannot be described even by Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva , protect all the beings in  the entire world and  destroy the fear of evil (DM.4.4)

yasyāḥ prabhāva matulaṃ bhagavān ananto / brahmā haraśca na hi vaktumalaṃ balaṃ ca।  sā caṇḍikā akhila jagat paripālanāya / nāśāya cāśubha bhayasya matiṃ karotu ॥ 4.4

shiva-shakthi

For the limited purpose of understanding, the forms of the Mother are said to be three: Para the supreme form which is beyond senses and intellect; Sukshma the subtle formless mantras; and Sthula the physical form. She is also the illusion (Maya) and the redeemer of it. In Shaktha cult, Devi as Vac presiding over speech is the motivating power of every effort in the world. She is the concept of power inherent in gods, humans, animals, vegetation and everything else (bhumarupa).She is seen as one and as many, as it were, but one moon reflected in countless waters.

2.5. The Shakthas therefore adore the Mother Goddess, in love and reverence, as the ultimate reality, as Shakthi the supremely powerful goddess; as the primal cause, the sustenance and the withdrawal of the universe. She , indeed,  is Brahman. It said; just as a spider weaves its web out of its own body, the Mother Goddess Devi brings forth the entire universe out of her own body; and, she constitutes every created object (kshetra-swarupa). At the time of the dissolution, she withdraws the whole of the creation back into her womb (vishvagarbha); and there it rests as the seed of the next creation, when it will grow and blossom forth again. With that, the vision of God as Mother became the focus of devotion as also of its philosophical and mystical renderings.

Devi

3.1. The middle episode of the Devi Mahatmya describes how, in a long drawn battle, the gods having failed to overcome the powerful demon Mahisasura,   realized their inadequacies. Thereafter, the great gods willed into existence the blazing power in the form of the magnificent Great Goddess Durga by uniting their vital energies (tejas).In Durga, the diverse energies of the gods converged to form a single totality, a resplendent goddess in her own right.

3.2. Devi Mahatmya (DM: 2; 9-17) narrates, with awe and wonder, how a supremely powerful goddess was created from the combined anger of the gods: from the face of Vishnu filled with intense indignation as well as from that of Brahma and Shiva sprang forth fierce heat. From the bodies of Devas headed by Indra issued forth a resplendent lustre. All this brilliant light unified into one blazing pile of light like a glowing mountain throwing out flames in all directions, filling the whole space and beyond. Then that matchless splendour of light transformed itself into the Great Goddess, enveloping the three worlds by her brilliance (DM: 2.9-12).

Her face was produced from the light of Shiva; her hair from that of Yama; her arms from the lustre of Vishnu; her breasts from that of the Moon; her bust from that of Indra; her thighs and legs from that of Varuna. The three eyed goddess adorned with the crescent moon, jewels, ornaments, garments, garlands and rosaries of gems and beads, all offered by various Devas was resplendent in her majestic grandeur. She held auspicious weapons and emblems in her multiple arms.

 The Devi Mahathmya, with awe and wonder; and  with an overwhelming feeling of reverence, admiration, fear, describes  the grand, sublime and extremely powerful spectacle of the Devi in her manifestation as Mahalakshmi destroying  the demon Mahishasura. In a narration filled with divine longing and fascination, Devi Mahathmya describes   the terrible battle.  The Great Goddess fought the demon Mahishasura for nine days starting from prathipath (the first day of the brighter halfof the month of Ashvayuja; and killed the demon on the tenth day Vijaya-Dashami ending his reign of evil and terror. Her victory symbolizes the victory of good over evil.

Her golden body blazing with the brilliance of a thousand suns, seated on her lion, Chandi  as Mahalakshmi the most spectacular personification of lethal divine anger and of all cosmic energies sets forth to battle the Demon Mahisha the King of Asuras who was himself a combined power of demons; and who   had taken control of the minor gods. Riding a lion into battle, Durga the great warrior goddess slew the buffalo by cutting off its head and then she destroyed the spirit of the demon Mahisha as he emerged from the buffalo’s severed neck. It is through this mighty act that order was established in the world.

4.1. In the Third episode of the Devi Mahatmya, according to one version (DM: 10; 2-5), Durga brought forth from herself multiple groups of female warriors displaying various facets of her ferocious nature. Among the groups mentioned, the Sapta Matrkas and the Nava Durgas are prominent. Devi Mahatmya also refers to a group of goddesses having resemblance with Mahavidyas, though the text does not name them as such. A fiery burst of energy emerging from Devi’s third eye takes the dark skeletal form of goddess Kali. With her huge mouth and enormous tongue she ferociously laps up Raktabija’s blood, thus preventing the uprising of further demons. In this version, Kali is described as Matrka. And, after she overpowers and beheads Chanda and Munda, Kali is celebrated as Chamunda.The Devi declares that since Kali presented her with the heads of these two demons, she would henceforth be renowned in the world as Chamunda.Thereafter in the text, Kali and Chamunda become synonyms. Kali and the group of Matrkas destroy the forces of the demons Shumba and Nishumba.

Yasmāc-caṇḍaṃ ca muṇḍaṃ ca gṛhītvā tvamupāgatā । cāmuṇḍeti tato loke khyātā devī bhaviṣyasi7.27

[ Bhaskararaya Makhin  in his commentary interprets Chamunda as : ‘chamum, ‘army’ and lati, ‘eats’; meaning  that Chamunda is literally ‘she who eats armies’—a  reference to Kali as Chamunda who drinks the blood-army of the demon Raktabija.]

4.2. The Asura Shumba taunts the Goddess for winning a battle with the help of these other goddesses: “O Durga, you are puffed up with the pride of strength. Do not be haughty; you are exceedingly proud but you are indeed fighting with the strength of others”.

The Devi retorts and declares: “I am all alone in the world here. What other is there besides me, O you vile one? See that these goddesses are my own powers entering into myself.”

ekaivāhaṃ jagatyatra dvitīyā kā mamāparā । paśyaitā duṣṭa mayyeva viśantyo madvibhūtayaḥ ॥ 5॥ 

4.3. In the final battle against Shumba, Devi absorbs into herself Kali, the Matrkas as also the countless others, and stands supremely alone . The Devi affirms: “Through my power I stood here in many forms; all that has been withdrawn by me (into myself) and now I stand alone.” (DM: 10; 5-6)

tataḥ samastāstā devyo brahmāṇīpramukhā layam । tasyā devyāstanau jagmurekaivāsīttadāmbikā ॥ 6॥

ahaṃ vibhūtyā bahubhiriha rūpairyadāsthitā । tatsaṃhṛtaṃ mayaikaiva tiṣṭhāmyājau sthiro bhava ॥ 8॥

4.4. It is said; the assertion made by the Devi in the Devi Mahatmya was inspired by the powerful hymn Devi Sukta or Vac Sukta or Vac-Ambhrni-Sukta, which occurs in the tenth Mandala of the Rig-Veda (RV.10. 10.125) , regarded by most as the origin or the catalyst of worship of God as Mother. The highly charged hymn is, in fact, an ecstatic exclamation by Vach or Rishika Vagambhrina (the daughter of the sage Ambhrina) who identifies herself with Devi. This hymn is the most magnificent chant singing the almighty glory of the feminine principle, Devi the Supreme all-pervading Divinity. The Devi proclaims with great authority:

” I am the sovereign Queen, the bestower of all wealth, the most thoughtful, the first of those who merit worship, and the foremost of those to whom the sacrificial homage are submitted. The gods in all places worship me. I enter many homes; take numerous forms and permeate everything. Whoever eats, breaths, sees, speaks or hears does it only through me. They know it not, but yet they all dwell in me. Listen, I make the man I love exceeding mighty; make him a sage, a Rsi and a genius. I wage the war to protect the good. I blow like the breath of life creating all the worlds. I give birth to infinite expanse overspreading the earth. I transcend the heaven and yonder, the earth below and all the worlds. I, in my mighty grandeur, hold together all existence”.

[  Please click here for the rendering of Devi Sukta]

5.1. The Great Goddess combines in herself the multiple powers, energies (tejas) that flowed from of all other gods. And, She, the warrior fighting   for the defence of the divine order, is described as “filling the three worlds with her splendour, bending low the earth with the force of her strides, scratching the sky with her pointed diadem, shaking the nether worlds with the twang of her bowstring and standing there filling the ten directions of space with her thousand arms” (DM: 2:37-38).

5.2. Mahadevi in all her mystical embodiment of power in all its myriad forms is ferociously magnificent (Rudra-manohara) Chandika the ‘violent and impetuous one’. After the battle, Chandika the mother of all the worlds quaffed a divine drink again and again, and laughed, her eyes becoming red (DM: 3.34).

tataḥ kruddhā jaganmātā caṇḍikā pānamuttamam । papau punaḥ punaś caiva jahās āruṇa locanā ॥ 3.34

6.1. In some battles, Chandika, in her full might, fights as herself; but, in some other battles, she creates her own forces of female warriors such as Kali of most terrifying aspect as also Matrkas and others. And in some others, all her diverse forms combine back into her.

6.2. The Devi Mahatmya, generally, adores and addresses this full form of Devi which is the totality of all the diverse energies as Chandika the ferocious. And occasionally calls her out by various other names and titles, such as Ambika, the nurturing mother; as Durga the saviour; and, as Mahadevi the Great Goddess. In the Devi-kavacha attached to the Chandi, the Devi as Nava Durga is described as Shailaputri, Brahmacharini, Chandraghanta, Kushmanda, Mahagauri, Skandamata, Katyayani, Kalaratri, and Siddidhatri. 

navadurga

Devi Durga is also worshiped as Nava Durga in her nine other  splendorous forms as : Nilakanthi (bestower  of wealth and happiness ); Kshemankari (bestower of health and wellbeing); Harasiddhi (one who confers attainment of desires) ; Rudramsha –Durga (the counterpart of Rudra riding a lion); Vana Durga (the goddess of bountiful nature); Agni Durga ( bright and glowing like fire); Jaya Durga (resplendent goddess of victory and bestower of Siddhis ); Vindya Vasini Durga (the goddess who resides atop the green mountains of the Vindhya region with her ride lion standing beside her); Ripu-mari –Durga (fierce destroyer of enemies and their followers) and Mahishasura mardhini (Destroyer of Mahisha demon).

She also shares some appellations with the creator goddess such as Sri, Prakrti and Mahamaya. There are a host of other names of varied descriptions. Devi is the confluence of all opposites; and she encompasses all the ambiguities inherent in nature.

 

7.1. One of the most amazing facets of Devi, as narrated in Devi Mahatmya, is her independence and sovereignty. After the battle is won, the great warrior goddess does not return to the gods. She remains a supreme goddess in her own right. She is entirely separate from the gods and is able to produce further powers of her own. She as Shakthi also differs from the Vedic or the other the puranic goddesses. The Devi is not depicted as a consort. In fact she bears no special relationship with anyone other than with her devotees. She does not depend on male support for carrying out her ventures; but manages her male role herself. Nor does she lend her power to a male god. But, she rather assumes his powers to perform her own heroic deeds. The gods gave up their inner strength, fire and heat to create her; and in doing so they gave up their potency to her. At the end, the gods submitted to Devi (namaste sharanyey Shive) praying to her to protect and establish Peace and order in the world. (DM- chapter 11; Narayani-stuti).

adoration_of_supreme_goddess_by_vishnu_brahma_devas_hh70-b

The Narayani Stuti, narrated in chapter 11 of the Devi Mahatmya, is sung with great gusto charged with intense devotion and a blessed sense of fulfilment. The verses 13 to 21 of Narayani Stuti are dedicated to Matrkas – Brahmi, Maheshwari, Kaumari, Vaishnavi, Varahi, Narasimhi, Indri, Shivaduti, and Chamnda. In salutations to the Matrkas, the verses describe, in brief, the splendour, virtues, powers and vahanas of these deities which are but the aspects of the Maha Devi, the Great Mother Goddess.

Salutations to you Oh Narayani who assumes the form of :  Brahmi riding celestial Chariot Yoked with Swans; Maheshwari adorned with the moon , riding the Great Bull and holding the trident; Kaumari of great virtue holding the powerful spear, surrounded by peacocks , cocks and bears; Vaishnavi the most excellent holding shankha , chakra , gadha and the dhanus; Varahi appearing as a ferocious Boar sporting awesome tusks , rescuing Mother Earth from her distress; Narasimhi as lioness in fearsome rage , destroying the enemies and protecting the three worlds; Indri the glorious queen of thousand eyes , destroyer of the Demon Vritra , in all her splendour decorated with a diadem and holding a blazing thunderbolt; Shivaduti roaring loudly  who sent Shiva himself as messenger and destroyed the Demons; and, Chamunda the most ferocious and invincible  with dreadful face and sharp protruding fangs , adorned with garland of severed heads, the destroyer of Demons Chanda and Munda.

7.2. The Devi Mahatmya, at another level, glorifies the Goddess as the ultimate creative force of the Universe. She no longer is a goddess created by the united energies of other gods, but is the supreme power having the Universe as her form; she is the supreme consciousness, the supreme knowledge, the supreme memory, the great delusion as also the one who grants liberation from delusion. She is the consciousness, the principle of knowledge and perception through which all of the existence, real or apparent becomes known. She is the Shakthi, the womb (Hiranyagarbha) the source of everything   , the origin of the phenomenal world; and one who gives manifest forms to other divine energies Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. Without her, the gods are inactive, and nonexistent. She is the supporter of the world, the cause of its maintenance and its dissolution.

Another text, the Devi Bhagavata Purana, declares she is present everywhere, right up from the creator god Brahma, down to a blade of grass (DBP: 1.9.31-32). She proclaims to Vishnu that she is everything that is seen (DBP: 1.15.52).

7.3. The Yoga believes that the Great Mother is manifest in two polar extremities. One: on physical plane, where she seems shrouded by her own created matter, coiled and asleep. The other is: the fully awakened state, the highest state of bliss and illumination, which is one and the same as Shiva the Supreme consciousness. She is Kundalini-shakthi. She is realized in the microcosm as the ultimate goal of yoga.

7.4. Thus, in the Devi Mahatmya , the Devi is depicted in varieties of ways : as the creation of the gods , brought forth by uniting their energies – as an independent goddess who produces further powers of her own – as the culmination of all the feminine powers of the past , present and future – as the Great Mother Goddess who gives manifest forms to all the gods including Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva – as the Supreme Goddess , the ultimate creative force of the Universe – as   the supporter of the world, the cause of its maintenance and its dissolution – and , She is verily the Brahman.

7.5. Devadatta Kāli who has translated the Devi Mahatmya’ with dignity and eloquence befitting a sacred text  ‘, writes :  even Sixteen centuries after its composition, the Devi Mahatmya still shines as a beacon from a primordial age when men and women , enchanted by nature’s beauty and abundance , yet terrified by its fierce , destructive power , honoured the source of creation as the Great Mother….Even today, the great hymn of praise that is the Devi Mahatmya reveals to us an all-embracing vision of harmony between the Mahadevi’s abiding earthly presence and transcendental unity proclaimed by the seers of the ancient India.

Symbolisms

8.1. The Chandipata is recited by the devotees with great fervour and reverence in glory of Devi and her all- pervasive power and majesty. It is an act of intense love and devotion; and indeed is regarded as the very fulfilment of one’s existence. Apart from that, there are various symbolisms associated with the exploits of the Devi.

8.2. The Chandi depicts conflicts between the Devi on one side and the prominent Asuras on the other .It seems like an allegorical representation of the continual battles between the divine and the demonic in the human. Her adversaries represent the all-too-human impulses arising from the pursuit of power, possessions and pleasure; and from delusions of self-importance. They are, in particular, described in the traditional texts as eight evil dispositions which corrupt human nature and prevent entry of pure light.

8.3. The Devi’s battle field is indeed the human consciousness. Therein, every dominant passion or instinct produces its special array. The deep rooted passions and prejudices within us often seem indestructible. When one is killed the other one rises up instantly – just as Rakthabija whose every drop of blood regenerates host of similar demons. Our passions and instincts whenever they find they are in danger of being eradicated or suppressed change their form, appearance, colour and sublimate, trying to disguise and escape , or even try to justify their existence.

The Devi, the supreme Goddess, in all her kindness and love, confronts the demons of ego and dispels our mistaken idea of who we are. Paradoxically –it is she who creates the delusion in the first place; and it is she alone who awakens us to our true being. It is the awakening of the Mother-consciousness within that makes us strong enough to overcome the evil.

Devadatta Kali in his commentary and translation of the Devi Mahatmya (In Praise of the Goddess and the Veiling Brilliancevisualizes the Great battle that the Devi fought as the very reflection of the various facets our inner consciousness.  Devi, of course, is the Supreme Self; the gods being the positive aspects such as mind, consciousness; and, the Demons are indeed the obstacles, frustrations and failures that we strive to overcome.

According to him, the battle is about regaining nature of one’s true self; and overcoming the sense of loss, limitation and dispossession. The main characters that figure in the narration are all afflicted by dispossession; the king is disposed of his realm by his scheming rivals; the merchant is dispossessed of his wealth by his greedy relatives; and, the gods are driven out of the heaven by the Demons.  We the readers, also face in our lives defeat and dispossession.  It is the grace of the Devi that helps us all to overcome the obstacles and regain our true nature.

The Devi Mahatmya, he says, is about understanding the process of the working of our mind; and, the very nature of our lives. One thought succeeds the other in an endless sequence; we are ever distracted, restless and forget out true self.  The text is about being aware of the working of our mind; conquering the restless process of our mind ;and , attaining  equanimity and peace.

It is the celebration of the sense of divine, beauty, wonder and joy that ultimately pervades the Devi Mahatmya.]

[ Dr. Satya Prakash Choudhary explains:

At one level the Devi Mahatmya chronicles the battle between the Devi and the Asuras. At another level it deals with the battle of life. At yet another level it deals with the inner battle between the divine and the demoniac forces within the human psyche, between the positive and negative.

The battlegrounds represent our own human consciousness, and its events symbolize our own experiences. The demons are symbolic of the psychic forces within the shadow. They represent all the evils in the external world that have been internalized. Whatever has been internalised in turn again manifests externally in our life.

The Divine Mother is our own true being, our inherent divinity and wholeness. Her clashes with the demons symbolize the outward and inward struggles we face daily. The Devi, personified simultaneously as the one supreme Goddess and also the many goddesses, confronts the demons of ahamkara or ego (our mistaken notion of who we are or what we identify ourselves with), of excessive tamas and rajas, that in turn give birth to other demons of excessive craving, greed, anger and pride, and of incessant citta vrttis (compulsive inner thought processes springing from past karmic residue).

In the ultimate sense, the dichotomy between the bad and the good is also a false one. There is no duality. Both are part of one single paradoxical reality. The text drives home this truth so beautifully.]

8.4. Since we are talking here about the Matrkas the mother-like deities lets also briefly look at their symbolisms associated with the Mother.

In Tantra, the letters of the alphabets are the perceptible forms or the aspects of the Mother; and hence are termed as Matrkas, the mother-like who attend on the Great Mother and approximate her to some extent. It believed that the fifty-two alphabets of the Sanskrit language emanated from the Mother; and she takes the name in every one of them. During the ritual worship of the Mother, her presence is invoked in the body of the Sadhaka through a procedure known as anga-nyasa or consecration of the different parts of the body. It is meant to emphasize   that you belong to the Mother; and you are sanctified by her presence in you.

9.1. The goal and the summit of the Tantric-sadhana is the identity with the Mother divine. It is to feel and to experience you are no longer separate but truly a child and a part of her consciousness. She is always in you; and you in her. It is a stage as Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa explained: a simple, natural and constant experience that all your thoughts, seeing and actions, and your very breathing and existence comes from her and are hers. You realize , see and feel that you are a person formed by her power out of herself, put out from her for play and yet always safe in her .You are indeed a being of her being, consciousness of her consciousness , force of her force and Ananda of her Ananda. And that is the true significance and essence of Mother-worship.

In the next part let’s take a broad look at the Origins, history and development of the Matrkas.

Mahadevi

Continued in Part Two

 

References and Sources

The iconography of the saptamatrikas: by Katherine Anne HarperEdwin Mellen press ltd (1989-10)

Saptamatrka Worship and Sculptures by Shivaji K Panikkar; DK Print World (1997).

The Roots of Tantra by Katherine Anne Harper (2002)

Hindu Goddesses: Vision of the Divine Feminine in the Hindu Religious Traditions by David Kinsley; (1987)

Tribal Roots of Hinduism by SK Tiwari; Sarup and Sons (2002)

The Portrait of the Goddess in the Devī-māhātmya by David Kinsley

The Little Goddesses (Matrikas) by Aryan, K.C; Rekha Prakashan (1980)

Goddesses in Ancient India by P K Agrawala; Abhinav Publications (1984)

The Tantra of Sri Chakra by Prof. SK Ramachandra Rao; Sharada Prakashana (1983)

Matrikas:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrikas

Sapta Matrikas and Matrikas

http://shaktisadhana.50megs.com/Newhomepage/Frames/forumframebodyindex.html

The mother goddess in Indian sculpture By Cyril Veliath

http://www.info.sophia.ac.jp/fs/staff/kiyo/kiyo37/veliath.pdf

Some discussions on the Skanda – Tantra and Balagrahas

http://manasataramgini.wordpress.com/2008/09/03/some-discursion-on-skanda-tantra-s-and-balagraha-s/

The Mahabharata of Krishna –Dwaipayana Vyasa (Book 3, Part 2) Section 229

http://www.bookrags.com/ebooks/12333/180.html

Devis of the first enclosure

http://shaktisadhana.50megs.com/Newhomepage/Frames/gallery/Khadgamala/1stenclosureB.html

 All pictures are from Internet

 
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Posted by on October 6, 2012 in Devi, Saptamatrka

 

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