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Srisukta Part Three

23 Oct

Continued from Part Two

Please do read Part One which serves as an introduction to Srisukta

Please also click here for a rendering of Srisukta (The link seems to work better with Google Chrome)

Mantra Eight

क्षुत्पिपासामलां ज्येष्ठामलक्ष्मीं नाशयाम्यहम् |
अभूतिमसमृद्धिं च सर्वां निर्णुद मे गृहात् ||८||

Kshut pipásá-amalám jyesthám alakshmím náshayámy aham
Abhūtim asamriddhim cha sarván nirnuda me grihat|| (8)

 [The Rishi of the mantra is Maha Vishnu; Its Chhandas is Anustubh; and its Devata is Sarva-aishwarya–karini Mahalakshmi who grants all kinds of riches. Kshum is the Bija; Haam is the Shakthi; and, Srim is the Kilaka. Its viniyoga is a-lakshmim-nasham.]

By your grace, I shall get rid of Jyeshta, the A-lakshmi who is the very personification of hunger, thirst, squalor and all other miseries. Oh Mother, drive away from my home pain, poverty, and decadence.

***

20.1. The eighth verse of Srisukta submits a prayer to destroy A-lakshmi (alakshmír me naśyatám). And, as mentioned, A-lakshmi is the opposite of Lakshmi and stands for everything that Lakshmi is not. A-lakshmi is personified as Jyeshta the elder sister of Lakshmi; and she is portrayed as ugly, irritable, cruel and impoverished. Jyeshta represents  the wretched and loathsome aspects of life.

20.2. One of the commentaries mentions the six types of miseries or six waves of disturbances (shad-urmi) that afflict human life. They are: hunger (kshuda); thirst (pipasa); agony of grief (shoka – mano vyadha); delusion (moha); old age or decay (jara); and, death (marana).

These miseries are attributed to the evil influence of three types of A-lakshmis. Of these the first two (hunger and thirst) are caused by Jyeshta, the elder A-Lakshmi. The next two (grief and delusion) are said to be caused by Madhyama, the middle or the second A-Lakshmi. And, the other two miseries (decay and death) are said to be caused by Kanishta the least or the third A-Lakshmi. All these A-Lakshmis hinder life.

20.3. The devotee prays to Sri to drive out (nirnuda) of his home abhooti (an-aishwarya, the lack of well being) which is poverty, and asamriddhi (lack of progress or growth) which is decay.

21.1. The Dhyana-sloka of this verse is addressed to Garuda, Suparna the King of the ‘sunbirds’ who destroys ignorance and misery.

Ajnana-pathaka-tamah-sthiti- surya-rashmim
daurbhagya-bhu-dhara- vidarana- vajra-mide |
roga-arti-ghora-phani mardana pakshi-rajam
lakshmi-pada-dwaya-anartha- haram sukharthi ||

Mantra Nine

गंधद्वारां दुराधर्षां नित्यपुष्टां करीषिणीम् |
ईश्वरीं सर्वभूतानां तामिहोपह्वये श्रियम् ||९||

Gandha dvárám durá dharşhám nitya-pushtám karíshiním
Iśhvarígm sarva bhūtánám tám ihó pahvaye śhriyam| (9)

[The Rishi of the mantra is Maha Vishnu; its Chhandas is Anustubh; and, its Devata is Sri Mahalakshmi. Gam is the Bija; Hrim is the Shakthi; and, Shrim is Kilaka. Its viniyoga is krishi-phala, dhana-dhanya-sampath, and Prabhtva-prapti.]

I pray to Sri who is forgiving and tolerant as the Mother earth, who is richly fragrant and ever nourishing, who is always prosperous, who is the supreme ruler of all creatures, and without whom no life is possible. May that Sri who is full of love towards all enter my life.

***

22.1. Sri is addressed in this verse as Mother Earth who supports and sustains all life, with infinite patience and with boundless love towards all. No life is possible without Sri and her grace; and, she is indestructible (durdasham).

22.2. The other explanation for the term durdasham is that Sri yields only to untainted love and devotion (bhakthi-vashya); and, never to compulsion or force.

23.1. Fragrance or the sense of smell (gandha) is the basic property (guna) of the principle of Earth-element (prithvi tattva). Sri being Prithvi, fragrance is one her characteristics. She is gandha-vathi, the one who is endowed with fragrance. Later, in the epics, Bhu (earth) comes to be recognized as one of the direct (pratyaksha) forms of Lakshmi.  The Lalitha-ashtottara-shata-naamavali that adores Devi Lalitha with 1008 names opens with the phrase which celebrates the Mother in the form of the Earth (Bhu rupa) that sustains all life: Bhu-rupa-sakala-adharai-namaha.

23.2. Sri is also the guardian deity of agriculturists; and, she is associated with agricultural prosperity, fertility and wealth (nityam-sada-sasyadibh-samriddham). Sri as earth is the eternal source of all forms of life and their nourishment (nitya-pushtam karishinim).Sri combines in herself the aspects of prosperity and productivity , which again are the virtues of Prithvi , the Mother Earth.

23.3. Karsha is one of the many names of Earth. It indicates auspiciousness (mangala pradathrim) as also the property to attract and hold (aakarshana, gravity).

24.1. It is said; the term karshnim also means cow dung,which is very essential for the success of agriculture. Plenty of cow dung is also indicative of abundance of cattle wealth (gau-samriddhi). There is a close association between Sri, cows and cow-products. The other ancient texts too cite this association. For instance; Maitrayani Samhita mentions that the other name for cow-pen is Lakshmi (goshtho vai namaisha lakshmih: MS: 4.2.1). And, Satapatha Brahmana states that one who has attained Sri (prosperity) is known as purishya, having plenty of cow-manure (purishya iti vat tamahuryah sriyam gachchhati: SB: 2.1.7).

25.1. The verse is addressed to Jatavedasa Agni, who is repeatedly requested to cause the goddess come to the worshipper.

25.2. The worshipper prays that Sri may stay in the house abounding with agricultural wealth; and, may grant him with cows, food, wealth, prosperity, as also fame and fulfillment of all desires.

26.1.  It is also said; the   viniyoga of the mantra is  success in agriculture, abundance of agricultural and cattle wealth (dhana-dhanya-sumriddhi), eminence among the peers (mahatva) and acquisition of assets (prabhutva).

The Dhyana sloka prays to the indestructible (durdasham) Devi Sri adorned by plentiful (pruthulam)   nature (sasya malinim), surrounded by cows (gau vrinda) and the bestower of cows. She indeed is the ruler of all life (praninaam Isham

Govrinda-anugatam  dhyatva- surabhim sasya-maalinim |
prithulam  praaninam isham durdharsham shriyam-archayet ||

Mantra Ten

मनसः काममाकूतिं वाचः सत्यमशीमहि |
पशूनां रूपमन्नस्य मयि श्रीः श्रयतां यशः ||१०||

Manasah kámam ákūtím vácah satyam ashímahi
Paśhūnágm rūpam annasya mayi śríh shrayatám yaśhah|| (10)

[The Rishi of the mantra is Kaama; its Chhandas is Anustubh; and, its Devata is Sri Mahalakshmi. Mam is the Bija; Shum is the Shakthi; and, Shrim is the Kilaka. The viniyoga of the mantra is: Vac siddhi and bhoga-bhagya-siddhi.]

By the grace of Sri, let all my heart-desires, fervent hopes   and aspirations be fulfilled; let prosperity and fame abide in me; and, let me be blessed with abundance of food, cattle-wealth and other riches. Bless me with truthfulness in my speech.

****

27.1. The worshipper prays to Sri for a prosperous life in a house abounding with agricultural wealth and other riches. He prays to Sri to grant him plentiful cows, food, wealth and prosperity. He requests:  May truthfulness be established in my speech; and may all my cherished desires and ambitions be fulfilled.

27.2. The term ‘akuthi’ signifies a determined aspiration (sankalpa) that has taken a grip over ones heart; and, it is not a mere passing whim or a pleasant desire that floats away. Akuti, is therefore, understood as intense yearning or determined resolve. The attainment of such deep-rooted aspirations is possible only with the grace of Sri.

27.3. Similarly, vachas satyam or truthfulness is more than not – telling- a- lie or stating a  fact . The term signifies, here, integrity in life; and purity in word, thought and deed. Sathya is said to be the principle of integration in life. It is the truth of being.

There is a faith that the words uttered by one who is pure in heart and mind do not go in vain, but they do come true (vac-siddhi).

The worshipper in this mantra pure in word (vac) and mind (manas) is determined (akutim) to attain Sri.

28.1. The Dhyana sloka of this mantra is dedicated to Lakshmi who induces the wisdom of life in all beings

Taam dhyayet satya-sankalpam laksmim kshiirodana-priyam I
khyataam sarveshu bhuteshu tatva-jnana-bala- kriyaam II

Mantra Eleven

कर्दमेन प्रजाभूता मयि सम्भव कर्दम |
श्रियं वासय मे कुले मातरं पद्ममालिनीम् ||११||

Kardamená praja-bhūtá mayi sambhava kardama
Śriyam vásaya me kule mátaram padma-máliním| (11)

[The Rishi of the mantra is Kardama; its Chhandas is Anustubh; and, its Devata is Mahalakshmi. Kam is the Bija; Vam is the Shakthi; and, Shrim is the Kilaka. Vamshabhiruddi, Aishwaryasiddhi are the viniyoga.]

Oh…Kardama the son of Sri, I welcome you heartily. Bring along your Mother who is adorned with lotus-garlands. Reside with me; and, also request the Mother Sri to reside in my home.

***

29.1. Elsewhere in Srisukta, the terms Kardama and Chikliita are understood as wet or fertile soil that is suitable for agriculture. And, the association of the goddess with wet soil (kardama, chiklita) is also mentioned. However, in the eleventh and the twelfth mantras of Srisukta, Kardama and Chikliita are the names of two sages.

29.2. The eleventh mantra is, in fact, addressed to Sage Kardama. There are, however, varying descriptions of the relation between Kardama and Sri. Vishnu Purana mentions that Sage Kardama requested Sri who emerged out of the milky ocean; and adopted her as his daughter (prathitha tasmai tanayaa abhuth).The phrase Kardamená praja-bhūwould then mean: ‘the one who let herself to be seen as the daughter of Kardama’.

29.3. At another place it is said, Sri adopted three sages as her sons (manasa-putra). Among the three was Kardama; and the other two were: Ananda and Chiklita (Ananda, Kardamashaiva Chikleetha ithi vishrutha I Rishayasthe thraya proktha). By taking them as her sons, Sri became a mother (prakrishtam apatyam yasyah saa suputravati ityarthah). Now, the phrase Kardamená praja-bhūwould mean: ‘the one who appeared as Mother because of Kardama’.

29.4. Since this mantra is addressed to Kardama and Sri is described here as ‘maataram shriyam’, it is, generally, taken to mean that Sri, here, is the mother of Kardama. Some versions mention `tava maataram’, meaning `your mother’, referring to Kardama.

29.5. The commentators have explained, the words `tava maataram’’ do not merely refer to Kardama, but they do refer to the whole of existence whose mother is Sri (chetananam srih). The Lalitha-sahasra-nama commences by adoring Sri as the Mother `Srimata‘.

30.1. The description of Sri as Padma-malinim is ordinarily taken to mean Sri who is decorated with lotus-garlands. But, Tantra regards Sri as moola prakrti the cause of the whole of this existence; and, lotus as a symbol of the created world.  The world, as we experience, is characterized by several principles (tattva) as enumerated in Samkhya (avyakta, mahat, ahamkara, the senses, the physical elements etc). And, all these tattvas are but the aspects of Devi as she evolves from a-vyakta to vyakta, from the infinitely subtle to the gross physical world. The lotuses strung on the garland adoring Sri symbolize her tattvas.

31.1. It is said; the import (bhava) of the mantra is that when Kardama is invited, the most gracious (Kalyani) Sri out of boundless affection for her son (sa vatsa gauriva preeta) follows him (sa vatsa gauriva preeta Kardamena yatha Indira; Kalyani math gruhe nityam nivaseth Padmalini).

31.2. It is explained; when the worshipper requests Kardama to cause Sri to reside in his home forever (math gruhe nityam nivaseth), it truly means inviting the grace (anugraha) of Sri into his heart.

32.1. The Dhyana-sloka is dedicated to the Devi who grants the wishes of her devotees (sarva-abhista-phala-pradam) and ever blesses with abundant riches (sampath-samruddhi). She is described as glowing with crystal clear complexion (spatika sannibham), adorned with gorgeous dresses (divya-ambara–krutam), sparkling gem-studded crown (nana-ratha-kirita) and earrings (kundalam). She is holding a pair of fresh and tender lotuses (padma-komala – yugam).  And, a most beautiful gentle smile lightens up her radiant face.

Dhyayet spatika-sannibham dwinayanam divya-ambara-alankritaam
satphullodara padma-komala-yuga-shriimath-karambhoruham.
Nana-ratna-kiriita-kundala-lasad-vaktra-ambujam padminim
sarva-abhiishta-phala-pradana-niratam sampa-tsamriddhyai sadaa

 

Mantra Twelve

आपः सृजन्तु स्निग्धानि चिक्लीत वस मे गृहे |
नि च देवीं मातरं श्रियं वासय मे कुले ||१२||

Ǎpah srijantu snigdháni chiklíta vasa me grihe
Nicha devím mátaram śhriyam vásaya me kule|| (12)

[The Rishi of the mantra is Chiklita (Chandra is also mentioned as the Rishi); its Chhandas is Anustubh; and, its Devata is Amriteshwari Mahalakshmi, Sri the mother of Chikliita. Aam is the Bija; lum is the Shakthi; and, Shrim is the Kilaka. Its viniyoga is sthira-lakshmi, jnana-siddhi and anna-siddhi.]

Oh… Chiklita, the son of Sri, reside in my home; and, please also cause the Mother goddess Sri to stay with me and with my generations to come. Let the life-giving waters create harmonious relations among all.

***

33.1. This mantra is in continuation of the eleventh mantra inviting Kardama the son of Sri and requesting for Sri to abide with the worshipper forever. This time, the request is submitted to the other son of Sri, Chikliita, to stay in his home (nivasa mad grihe) firmly (nischaram) forever, and bring along his mother (tvan maatha).

34.1. It is said;Chikliita is the favourite (preeti-para) son of Sri (Sri-suta), and she, out of affection, follows his wishes. The purport of the mantra is :  just as Chikliita enters into the house (tad agamana matrena), Sri follows him, lovingly, of her own accord (tva manu vrajeth).

34.2. Sri is addressed in this Mantra as: Devim mataram shriyam, the resplendent Mother Goddess Sri who shines forth (div) and enlivens all creation. She is not merely the mother of Chiklita, but is the Mother of the universe (vishwa matarah).

[There is an alternate explanation.Sri is the guardian deity of agriculture (krishini); and is associated with agricultural prosperity.  As mentioned earlier,the terms: ardra (moist), kardama (mud) and chiklita (fertile soil) are all related with fertility, prosperity and growth. All these terms strengthen her association with food and water (apah srajanti snigdhani chilita).

But, in the context of this mantra, Chiklita is understood as a sage who was regarded as one of the sons of Sri. Some identify Chiklita with Kama , the god of desire, since  the eleventh and twelfth  verses are about fulfillment of desires . And, one of the Dhyana slokas pays respect to Chiklita and Sri Devi, together: namostute tubyam Chiklita-Sri-Devyayi namao namah. ]

35.1. The mantra also refers to Apah the waters, smooth and friendly (snigda) that bring harmony and well being into life. Apah itself is the very source of all life.

There is an extended discussion on the term Apah.

35.2. Apah ordinarily denotes waters. But, in the ancient texts, Apah is a term that is heavily loaded with layers and layers of esoteric meanings and interpretations.  In the most celebrated hymn of creation – Nasadiya Sutktha which occurs in the Tenth Book of Rig Veda, as also in the Vak Suktha (RV.10.8.125) and in the Hiranya-garbha Suktha (RV. 10.121) the terms Apah represents Great Waters or the primeval matter of creation. It stands for the manifest as also for the un-manifest primeval matter. That is; these Great waters represent the immense potential of Prakrti in its un-manifest (a-vyakta) state. It has that potential to give expression to infinite possibilities as forms (vyakta).

35.3. Apah or Salilam is, thus, conceived as the threshold prior to which there was no distinction between existence and non-existence; between form and formlessness. Whatever that was there prior to it was neither sat nor a-sat; neither being nor non-being. It is the first stage of creation. That is; Apah represents Prakrti (as in Samkhya); and it is the primary source of all possibilities of manifestation in the world.

35.4. In theVak Suktha or Devi Suktha    of Rig Veda (RV.10. 10.125), in an intense and highly charged superb piece of inspired poetry, Devi declares “I sprang from waters there from I permeate the infinite expanse. It is I who blows like the wind creating all the worlds “.

अहं सुवे पितरमस्य मूर्धन्मम योनिरप्स्वन्तः समुद्रे । ततो वि तिष्ठे भुवनानु विश्वोतामूं द्यां वर्ष्मणोप स्पृशामि ॥७॥अहमेव वात इव प्र वाम्यारभमाणा भुवनानि विश्वा । परो दिवा पर एना पृथिव्यैतावती महिना सं बभूव ॥८॥

Aham suve pitaram asya murdhan Mama yonir apsv antah samudre Tato vi tisthe bhuvananu visvo ‘tamum dyam varsmanopa sprsami || 7

Aham eva vata iva pra vamy Arabhamana bhuvanani visva Paro diva para ena prthivyai ‘tavati mahina sam babhuva || 8

35.5. It is also said ‘waters are the Truth…where waters flow there the Truth resides …. It is the waters indeed that were made first of this universe, hence when waters flow then everything whatever that exists in the universe is brought forth’ (Sathapatha Brahmana).

35.6. To explain it in another way; these dark, deep and unfathomable waters (gahanam ghabhiram – RV. 10.129.1) hold in their womb the un-manifest universe. And, it is from these dark waters the manifest world springs forth.

35.7. Apah is, thus, the universal mother–principle. It is perhaps for that reason that Rig-Veda says: ‘the waters (Apah) are our mother (apah asmin matarah), womb of the universe (ambayah),’ (RV.1.23.10).

35.8. It is explained; when Sri is described as waters (Apah) that bring harmony and wellbeing into life, the mantras of Srisukta echoe the ancient concept of water as the creative principle (Shakthi), the nectar (madhu), and the joy of life. Sri Devi the Mother Goddess as Apah is Prakrti.  She denotes freedom from bondage. She is the Mother of all creation. She gives birth to manifest reality – the past, the present and the future; of “all that has been and will be born”. She is the nourishing mother who harmoniously blends (srijantu snigdháni), heals and purifies life.

 [Tantra of the Shakthas, on the other hand, regards Sri as a tattva the principle that is beyond any known identity (Brahmarupini). She is both Purusha and Prakrti  (prakrti–purushatmakam–jagat). She is vishwa-matruka the origin of all existence (yoshith Purusha rupena sphurantee vishwa-matruka).]

36.1. The Lotus symbolizes waters as also life. Lotus and water with which Sri is closely associated, both, symbolize life, purity and radiant beauty.

37.1. The Dhyana sloka of the mantra is dedicated to Devi Amrutheshwari .She is described as seated under the Kalpataru–tree, upon a throne studded with gems, elaborately adorned with rich ornaments, wearing a multi-coloured- gem-studded upper garment (Sarva-ratna-vichitra-angim), having red coloured lotus as the footstool,   holding a golden sceptre, a pair of lotus flowers and blessing the entire world.

Dhyayet kalpatarormule ratna-simhasane sthitam
padma-dwaya-dharam padmam varada-abhaya-dharinim.
Sarva-ratna-vichitra-angim rakta-shri-pada-piithikam
hema-danda-sita-Chatra-chamara-dwaya vijiam

Mantra Thirteen

आर्द्रां पुष्करिणीं पुष्टिं पिङ्गलां पद्ममालिनीम् |
चन्द्रां हिरण्मयीं लक्ष्मीं जातवेदो म आवह ||१३||

Ardám pushkariním pushtim pingalám padma máliním
Chandrám hiran-mayím lakshmím játavedó ma ávaha| (13)

[The Rishi of the mantra is Jatavedasa; its Chhandas is Anustubh; and, its Devata is Sri Mahalakshmi. Aum is the Bija; Svaha is the Shakthi; and, Shrim is the Kilaka. Its Viniyoga is amritatva siddhi.]

Oh…Jatavedasa Kindly invoke for me Lakshmi the Supreme ruler who isbeautiful like the moon that shines, radiant like the yellow burnished gold, brilliant like the sun; adorned with lotus-garlands and gleaming ornaments; who is served by the elephants; who is compassionate and  who nourishes all.

***

38.1. This mantra is very similar to the first mantra. And, in fact, the second line of this mantra is the same as the second line of the first mantra. After submitting his requests to Kubera, Manibhadrda, Kirti, Kardama and Chiklita, the worshipper returns to Jatavedasa, the Agni. It is as if the worshipper has traversed a full circle and submitted his original plea afresh to Jatavedasa.

38.2. Sri, again, is described with the term ardra, which here indicates the flowing grace; the easily-moved, kind and considerate nature of Sri Devi who is the very embodiment of compassion.

38.3. Sri’s association with water, lotus and elephants is again pictured here with use of words: ardra, pushkarnim and padmamalinim. Ardram, as said, refers to kind-heartedness of Sri, and it also suggests Sri being served by two elephants that pour over her pots of water; and she becoming wet. The phrase ardram–pushkarnim–pusta suggests sprinkling of water through lotus flowers. And, pushkarnim, again, suggests the lotus-pool as also a female elephant. Her description as padma-malinim indicates she is adorned by lotus garlands.

39.1. The term Pushti means abundant nourishment; and, it suggests the motherly nature of Sri who nourishes. Devi Mahatmya describes the Devi as :Yaa Devi sarva bhuteshu pushti rupena samsthita. She is the Mother who nourishes and sustains the whole universe.

39.2. Pingala indicates the reddish golden-yellow tint at the edge of the flame. Sri Devi is said to be glowing with the pingala complexion. It is also a combination of sattva and rajo gunas. Pingala is also one of the many names of Durga.

40.1. The Dhyana sloka of the mantra describes the Devi bright and beautiful like mellow glowing moon, smiling gently, seated on a lotus. A prayer is submitted to her to eradicate A-lakshmi misery, ugliness and ignorance.

Aakaasha-padmaakara-chandrabimba plavollasantim  paripurna-kantim .
padma-sthitam padm-akaram prapadye lakShmim alakshmi vinivrittaye.

Mantra fourteen

आर्द्रां यः करिणीं यष्टिं सुवर्णां हेममालिनीम् |
सूर्यां हिरण्मयीं लक्ष्मीं जातवेदो म आवह ||१४||

Ǎrdhám yah kariním yashtim suvarnám hema-máliním
Sūryám hiran-mayím lakshmím játavedó ma ávaha|| (14)

[The Rishi of the mantra is Jatavedasa; its Chhandas is Anustubh; and, its , Devata is Sri  Rajyalakshmi. Shrim is the Bija; Hum is the Shakthi; and, Hrim is the Kilaka. Its Viniyoga is rajya prapti. ]

Invoke for me, O Jaataveda, Lakshmi who is compassionate; who shines like gold; who is brilliant like the sun; who is adorned with golden ornaments and garlands; who wields the sceptre of the supreme ruler; and who inspires men to perform their ordained duties.

***

41.1. This mantra is similar in its structure to the thirteenth mantra. It refers to the virtues associated Surya in place of that of Chandra as in the previous mantra.   There are certain other new expressions.

 [ The idea of the Mother Goddess being the Supreme Ruler of all existence appears in many texts. This Mantra  which refers to Sri  as one who wields the scepter of the supreme ruler; and who inspires men to perform their ordained duties is similar to verse three of Vac-Sukta where the Devi declares: I am the Queen, a repository of good things, wise, the first of those worthy of sacrifice. As such, I pervade many forms.

Aham rastri samgamani vasunam Cikitusi prathama yajniyanam Tam ma deva vy adadhuh purutra Bhunisthatram bhury avesayantim || 3 ]

42.1. The phrase yah kariním yashtim is much debated. It either means a royal scepter or the Danda of Dharma Devatha dispensing justice. Or, it could be both.

42.2. The other interpretation refers to the term pushkarini, which appears in the previous mantra. And, there it meant a female elephant. The term yah kariním in this mantra is said to be a variation of pushkarini. And, it is meant to suggest a female elephant strolling with a bit of swagger, arrogance and a certain abandon or disdain . The gait of the Devi is compared to that of the female elephant.

43.1. In this mantra, the glory and luster of the Devi is compared to that of the Sun (suryavath prakashamanam tad rupam vaa).  The commentators explain that Sri here is Savithri-Gayatri the solar goddess. Both are the forms of sanketa-vidya or atma-vidya.

43.2. Another explanation mentions that one should recite Srisukta turning towards the sun, just as the lotus that is about to open at the first rays of the sun. The Sun and Lakshmi share the common epithet Padma-priya.   It is suggested that Sri should be meditated upon picturing her as settled in the solar-orb surrounding one’s heart-lotus (hruth padma vasini Devi, chid-rupini abhichyate). The yoga recognises anahata-padma as surya mandala located in the heart region. It is said; the inner consciousness of the devotee is indeed the lotus (hrudaya-aravinda), which is illumined and opened by the grace of the Devi. The Devi is truly surya-swarupini.

44.1. The Dhyana sloka of the mantra is dedicated to Mahalakshmi who is glowing like a precious diamond, holding set of arrows, a pot filled with nectar. Mahalakshmi grants kingdom and sovereignty. 

Padmam manimayam kumbham ikShuchaapam cha bibhratiim.
Pushpa-banaam mahalakshmim dhyayed raajya-pradayiniim

Mantra Fifteen

तां म आवह जातवेदो लक्ष्मीमनपगामिनीम् |
यस्यां हिरण्यं प्रभूतं गावो दास्योऽश्वान्विन्देयं पुरुषानहम् ||१५||

Tám ma ávaha játevedó lakshmím anapa gáminím yasyám
Hiranyam prabhūtam gávó dásyó aśván vindeyam purushan aham|| (15)

[The Rishi of the mantra is Kubera; its Chhandas is prasara-pankthi,, a verse with longer lines; and , its Devata is Mahalakshmi. Hrim is the Bija; Shrim is the Shakthi; and, Hrim is the Kilaka. The viniyoga of the mantra is rajya-prapti.]

O Jataveda…I pray to you. Let Lakshmi never ever go away from me. Let Lakshmi be with me forever. With her grace I shall gain wealth in plenty, abundance of gold, cattle, horses, servants and followers.

Lakshmi by Shilpi Sri Siddalingaswamy.jpg

45.1. The concluding mantra is similar to the second mantra. Both the mantras aspire for happiness, prosperity , a sense of well-being , wealth and riches in plenty, abundance of gold, cattle, horses, sons, grandsons, servants and followers. They pray to Lakshmi never to go away, but to reside in their forever and for generations to come.

45.2. This last mantra is regarded as the phala-sruti of Srisukta. It sums up the fruits of listening, reciting and meditating upon Srisukta.

46.1. The Dhyana sloka of the mantra is dedicated to Lakshmi the daughter of sage Bhrigu;  Mother of all existence ,  glowing with  a benign smile on her joyful face; bright as gold ;adorned with rich ornaments ;  seated upon a royal throne ; holding the royal signs of sceptre ; served by all ; worshipped by Agni; blessing the whole world ; and, conferring happiness and prosperity on all beings and nature.

Dhyaye lakshmim pra-hasita-mukhim raajya-simhasana-sthaam
mudra-shaktim sakala-vinuta- sarva-samsevyamanaam .
agnau -puujyam akhila-jananim hema-varnam hiranyam
bhagyopetam bhuvana-sukhadam bhaargavim bhuta-dhatriim

References and souArces

Goddesses in Ancient India by PK Agrawala; Abhinav Publications (1984)

Srisukta (in Kannada) by Prof SK Ramachanra Rao; Published by SAKSI (2209)

I gratefully acknowledge the sublime illustrations of the Sri Sukta which are the creations of the renowned artist of Vedic and traditional themes,   Shri GLN Simha of Mysore.  These are said to be in the collections of Ramsons Kala Pratishatana, Mysore

And the painting of Lakshmi by Shilpa Siddanthi Sri Siddalingaswamy of Mysore

http://www.kamakotimandali.com/blog/index.php?p=1140&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1

 
17 Comments

Posted by on October 23, 2012 in Srisukta

 

Tags: , , , , ,

17 responses to “Srisukta Part Three

  1. Harsha

    February 16, 2015 at 8:04 am

    The paintings used here are in the collection of Ramsons Kala Pratishatana, Mysore and the artist who has visualised and painted them is Sri G.L.N.Simha of Mysore, would appreciate if due credit is given to both thank you

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      February 16, 2015 at 12:06 pm

      Dear Sri Harsha , thank you for pointing out. Sorry , I was not aware of its creator.

      I have since corrected and said in both parts two and three:

      I gratefully acknowledge the sublime illustrations of the Sri Sukta which are the creations of the renowned artist of Vedic and traditional themes, Shri GLN Simha of Mysore. These are said to be in the collections of Ramsons Kala Pratishatana, Mysore

      Regards

       
  2. sreenivasaraos

    March 17, 2015 at 4:43 pm

    Dear Savita Thanks for reading the post closely and for the question.

    To put it simply :

    Tradition accepts that Rishi Veda_Vyasa (whoever he was) categorized and compiled four Vedas by splitting the primordial single Veda; and, rendered the Vedas more amenable to study and to memorize. The task of preserving and perpetuating each branch of the Veda, in its entirety and purity , was assigned to a specified Shakha (meaning branch).The followers of each Shakha , identified as Shakins of that particular Vedic school, were responsible for preserving their assigned part of the Veda. Followers of each Shakha would learn and preserve one the four Veda Samhitas along with their associated Brahmana, Aranyaka, Upanishads and the Sutras such as Grhyasutra and Shrautasutra.

    Of the many Shakhas, only a small number have survived. The prominent among them are Shakala and Bashakala. The present-day Rig-Veda is preserved mainly through Shakala and Bashakala. Considering its great age, the text is amazingly well preserved and uncorrupted.

    The Shakala version has 1,017 regular hymns (rks), and an appendix of 11 vālakhilya hymns which are customarily included in the eighth Mandala (as 8.49–8.59); thus bringing up a total of 1028 hymns.

    The Bashakala version too has 1,017 regular hymns (rks); but, has only 8 vālakhilya hymns. The total of hymns, here, in this branch is 1,025 hymns. However, Bashakala version has its own Appendix of 98 hymns.

    The 98 Mantras in the Appendix to Bashakala were not called as Rks; but, were named as khailika, which meant Addendum. The name was based in the term Khila, meaning a distinct or separate part of the Rig-Veda. The term Khila is the opposite of A-khila. And, A-khila stands for the integral part (Ahila) or the body of the Rig-Veda. Khila is treated separate from A-khila. And, Khilani is the plural form of Khila.

    The Khilanis of the Rig-Veda were by their very name and nature were later additions, perhaps, written at different points of time. But all Khilanis nevertheless, surely, date back to pre Buddhist times. And, they do belong to the ‘Mantra’ period of the Vedic texts.

    The hymns in the Khilani are regarded as regular Mantras and have sanctified role in rituals, even from the ancient times.The German Scholars have brought out a complete version of the Khila Verses of the Rig-Veda. Please check the following link, which is based on the edition by J. Scheftelowitz: Die Apokryphen des Rgveda (Khilani) Breslau 1906 (Indische Forschungen; 1)

    You can see Sri Sukta verses listed at Kh_2, 6. 1a

    The celebrated Sri Sukta appears as a set of fifteen Mantras in the Khila (supplement) to the Fifth Mandala of Rig-Veda, singing the glory and majesty of Sri .It is placed between the end of the fifth Mandala and the beginning of the sixth Mandala. These inclusions, perhaps, came into the Vedic texts when the gods and goddess tended to get personified.

    The set of fifteen Mantras (pancha-dasharcha) of the Sri Sukta has its own addendum of twelve (or thirteen) prayer-verses (slokas). In these slokas Sri gets identified with Lakshmi who is described as Vishnu-pathni.

    The Sri Sukta recited with joy and reverence on all auspicious occasions, has now, customarily , come to be associated Lakshmi the Goddess of beauty , wealth and fortune.

    Regards

     
  3. Bhaskar

    June 22, 2015 at 8:40 am

    Dear Mr.Srinivasa rao,

    You are one of the best commentator of our great Vedas, Agamas Etc. so far what ever we have learnt from your articles could not have been possible even if we read all the Vedas and other Sanskrit books. I have following doubt and only you can clarify.
    Lakshmi is considered as Bhargavi. Sage Brighu married daughter of Kardama. Hence a doubt araises as to how Kardama can be son of Sri ie Lakshmi. This is not a critisism but would personally like to clarify my doubt.

     
  4. Bhaskar

    June 22, 2015 at 9:11 am

    Dear Mr.Srinivasa rao,u

    You are one of the best commentator of our great Vedas, Agamas Etc. so far what ever we have learnt from your articles could not have been possible even if we read all the Vedas and other Sanskrit books. I have following doubt and only you can clarify.
    Lakshmi is considered as Bhargavi. Sage Brighu married daughter of Kardama. Hence a doubt araises as to how Kardama can be son of Sri ie Lakshmi. This is not a critisism but would personally like to clarify my doubt.

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      June 22, 2015 at 6:33 pm

      Dear Shri Bhaskar, thank you for reading closely and for the question.

      It is fair question. Yes; it is very confusing. I agree.

      There is not one Kardama; but , as many as four Kardama-s are mentioned in The Bhavavata Purana, Vishnu Purana etc

      Kardama (1) was said to be a son of Brahma ( out of his shadow) . He was one of the Prajapathi-s. He married Devahuthi, daughter of Swayambhu Manu. . Kapila was their son.

      Kardama (2) was also a Prajapathi. .He is also described as Deva-Rishi. He was the son of Pulaha (also called as Prajapathi Polaha) who married Kshama , one of the 24 daughters of Daksha- Prajapathi. Kardama was married to Sruti daughter of Atri and Anasuya.

      Kardama (3); He was the father of Sankhapāda, the Lokapala

      Kardama (4): Prajapathi; his wife was Sinivali

      Not much is said about Kardama (3) and Kardama (4).

      Now, Daksha, it is said , had as many as 24 daughters . Of these, the 13 were married to Dharma were : Sraddha, Srilakshmi, Dhriti, Tushti, Pushti, Medha, Kriya, Buddhi, Lajja, Vapu, Santi, Siddhi, Kirtti.

      Of the other 11 : Khyati was married to Bhrigu; Sati to Shiva(Bhava); Sambhuti to Marichi; Smriti to Angiras;Priti to Pulastya, Kshama to Pulaha; Sannati to Kratu; Anasuya to Atri; Urjja to Vasishtha., Swaha to Agni, and Swadha to Pitris.

      [To add to the confusion there were two Pulaha-s.
      Pulaha Prajapath (1) was a son of Brahma ; son in law of Daksha ; his wife was Kshama
      Pulaha (1) was also sons of Brahma; and he married Kardama’s (?) daughter Gati. And, had three sons.]

      Now, it is said. Kshama who married to Pulaha was also known as Lakshmi (one of the other daughters of Daksha was named Srilakshmi) had a son named Kardama. It is perhaps this Kardama that is referred to in Sri Sukta. It is just a guess; and not certain.

      I am sorry. I have not been of much help. Let me try to find out if there is a better explanation. Pardon me.

      Regards

       
      • Bhaskar

        June 23, 2015 at 5:13 am

        Dear Shri.Srinivasa Rao,
        Thank you very much for your reply. It is very interesting answer which once again triggers mind for further research. Like Kardama we also come across many Agastyas and Bharawajas. These multiple names at different periods of History give raise to many confusions which has led European writers to further create confusions in the mind of Indian persons. Even with young Indians these things lead to confusions, hence arguments about the Indian History like Ramayana and Maha Bharatha continues. Even learned parents are unable to clear these confusions which on many occasion prohibits them from clearly taking a stand on our history and culture.
        I was wondering if you can educate us by writing on characters of History with similar Names.

        Further can we have more details about another son of Lakshmi “Chiklitha”.
        Once again Thanks for your clarification and needless to tell you that We are really greatful to you for your excellent article.

         
      • sreenivasaraos

        June 23, 2015 at 3:06 pm

        Dear Shri Bhaskar Thanks.

        Regarding Chikliita, he does not seem to have a ‘history’ (unlike Kardama). Though he is described as a Rishi, the commentators tend to identify Chikliita with Kama (the god of desire), who creates craving, yearning and aspirations in the hearts of men/women. The handsome looking lovable Kama is said to be very dear to his mother Lakshmi. She dotes on him. It is also said; that Kama was again born to her as Pradyumna.

        Both the verses – eleventh and twelfth – are about fulfillment of one’s desires.

        As regards the other point you mentioned; I love to write in detail about Baudhayana the Sutrakara and Brthruhari the author of Vakyapadiya. There were many who went by those names. But, the two I am referring to were remarkable scholars. I hope, I would someday do it, God willing.

        Please do read the other articles, as well.

        Regards

         
  5. sreenivasaraos

    June 23, 2015 at 3:08 pm

    Dear Shri Bhaskar Thanks.

    Regarding Chikliita, he does not seem to have a ‘history’ (unlike Kardama). Though he is described as a Rishi, the commentators tend to identify Chikliita with Kama (the god of desire), who creates craving, yearning and aspirations in the hearts of men/women. The handsome looking lovable Kama is said to be very dear to his mother Lakshmi. She dotes on him. It is also said; that Kama was again born to her as Pradyumna.

    Both the verses – eleventh and twelfth – are about fulfillment of one’s desires.

    As regards the other point you mentioned; I love to write in detail about Baudhayana the Sutrakara and Brthruhari the author of Vakyapadiya. There were many who went by those names. But, the two I am referring to were remarkable scholars. I hope, I would someday do it, God willing.

    Please do read the other articles, as well.

    Regards

     
    • Bhaskar

      June 25, 2015 at 12:33 pm

      Dear Shri.Srinivasa Rao,

      I am very happy to note that you are going to write a series of articles on Baudhayana the writer of Sutras and also on Bruthruhari. It will be very interesting.
      Recently I came across a Kannada Translation for Kardama as Mire (ie equal to a paddy field ploughed with water that is called Kesaru in Kannada). I don’t know how important it is But as you said it represent agrarian Culture during the time of Vedas.

      You have mentioned that God willing you will take up other works. God is certainly willing and our prayers are there to give you more time to write and educate people like us.

      Once again thanks for your reply to my doubts.

       
      • sreenivasaraos

        June 25, 2015 at 2:45 pm

        Dear Shri Bhaskar, Thanks

        That is correct. Please see para 29.1 and 34.2 above .

        Lets see how it goes

        Regards

         
  6. Rajasimha Mullangi

    September 2, 2015 at 2:18 pm

    Dear Sir,

    Many thanks for this detailed explanation of Sri Sukta and dhyna slokas for each stanza (rukku)
    Am collecting the pictures Ammavaru as explained in Dhyna sloka of each stanza (Rukku).
    I noticed that the line diagrams of mahalakshmi below the dyana slokas are not exacly as explained in dhyana slokas.Could you please provide me the colour images of Lakshmi ammavaru as explained in dhyana slokas. or let me know the weblink of the images on net if available. many thanks….
    mullangii.rajasimha@gmail.com

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      September 3, 2015 at 8:27 am

      Dear Rajasimha, thank for reading; and, for reading it closely.

      I presume you are referring to the Dhyana-sloka adduced below the Mantra Fourteen, at paragraph 44.1, which pictures Mahalakshmi as glowing like a precious diamond, holding set of arrows, a pot filled with nectar.

      Yes. The Dhyana-slokas are taken from the texts; and are authentic. But, I could not get appropriate pictures, in all cases, to illustrate the sloka. Some might be slightly of the tangent. In such cases accept the text alone.

      Regarding the Great Goddess Mahalakshmi, the Supreme Divinity manifesting herself as Maha-Sarasvathi, Mahalakshmi and as Maha-Kali, please check my following link( which as provides some images) :

      https://sreenivasaraos.com/2012/10/06/mahalakshmi/

      Regards

       
  7. Rajasimha Mullangi

    September 2, 2015 at 2:26 pm

    Dear Sir,
    Many thanks for this detailed explanation of Sri Sukta and dhyna slokas for each stanza (rukku)

    Am collecting the pictures Ammavaru as explained in Dhyna sloka of each stanza (Rukku).

    I noticed that the line diagrams of mahalakshmi below the dyana slokas are not exacly as explained in dhyana slokas.Could you please provide me the colour images of Lakshmi ammavaru as explained in dhyana slokas. or let me know the weblink of the images on net if available. many thanks….

    mullangii.rajasimha@gmail.com

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      September 3, 2015 at 7:23 am

      Dear Rajasimha, thank for reading; and, for reading it closely.

      I presume you are referring to the Dhyana-sloka adduced below the Mantra Fourteen, at paragraph 44.1, which pictures Mahalakshmi as glowing like a precious diamond, holding set of arrows, a pot filled with nectar.

      Yes. The Dhyana-slokas are taken from the texts; and are authentic. But, I could not get appropriate pictures, in all cases, to illustrate the sloka. Some might be slightly of the tangent. In such cases accept the text alone.

      Regarding the Great Goddess Mahalakshmi, the Supreme Divinity manifesting herself as Maha-Sarasvathi, Mahalakshmi and as Maha-Kali, please check my following link( which as provides some images) :

      https://sreenivasaraos.com/2012/10/06/mahalakshmi/

      Regards

       
  8. Karthik

    June 17, 2016 at 5:12 pm

    Can I get the dhyana sloka of Sri sooktam in Kannada or Sanskrit?

     
    • sreenivasaraos

      June 17, 2016 at 5:29 pm

      Dear Kartik

      Please see

      Srisukta (in Kannada) by Prof SK Ramachanra Rao

      Regards

       

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